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Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz’s rapport with her subjects and her genius for posing them in surprising ways has led to some of the most iconic pictures of the twentieth century and has shaped our vision of celebrities.

The Jewess Behind the Camera

Photographers like Arbus, Goldin, and Leibovitz have brought their own unique worldviews–perspectives that were certainly informed by their religious background and gender identities–to their works. Their groundbreaking art has paved the way for contemporary young Jewish women aspiring to capture the moment through the camera. Their legacy will always stay in the hearts and minds of people around the globe, their photos stirring the hearts of simple people and arts aficionados alike.

Birth of photographer Annie Leibovitz

October 2, 1949

Annie Leibovitz, known for her photographic portraits of celebrities, was born.

Annie Leibovitz's first "Rolling Stone" cover features John Lennon

January 21, 1971

Appearance of photographer Annie Leibovitz's first cover photograph for Rolling Stone, featuring John Lennon.

Susan Sontag

In her essays, or "case-studies," examining art and the "modern sensibility," Susan Sontag covered topics from photography to illness to fascism. One of the most widely read cultural critics of her generation, she was a lightning rod for both praise and vilification.

Photographers in the United States

There is no simple way to categorize Jewish American women photographers—they are too diverse a group. They come from distinctly different political periods, economic strata, and even cultures (some were born abroad). They share neither mind-set nor style, their subjects and interests vary widely, and their worldview and art seem to have little to do with their Jewish identity.

Don’t call her Anna-Lou, or a lesbian

In week three of my Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia self-education program, I've been thinking about Annie Leibovitz.

Annie Leibovitz

For decades, Annie Leibovitz and her camera have exposed to the public eye subtleties of character in rock stars, politicians, actors, and literary figures that lay beneath their celebrity personae. Her work first fueled the American fascination with rock ’n’ roll dissidents in the 1970s and then, in the 1980s and 1990s, captured the essence of the day’s great cultural icons. Her photographs make plain that, as Leibovitz herself once put it, she was not afraid to fall in love with her subjects. Anna-Lou Leibovitz was born on October 2, 1949, in Westbury, Connecticut. She was the third of six children to Marilyn Leibovitz, a modern dance instructor, and Sam Leibovitz, an air force lieutenant colonel. As the daughter of a career military officer, Leibovitz moved with her family frequently from town to town. The constant relocation fostered strong ties among the six Leibovitz children.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Annie Leibovitz." (Viewed on October 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/11216>.

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