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Crafts

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam Schapiro helped pioneer the feminist art movement, both through her own pushing of creative boundaries and by creating opportunities for other women artists.

Bertha Schaefer

Bertha Schaefer helped pioneer a new era in interior design, creating collaborations between architects, interior designers, and craftspeople to create new homes for the post-war era.

Gertrud Amon Natzler

Ceramicist Gertrud Amon Natzler and her husband Otto created thousands of stunning ceramics together, an exquisite collaboration that continued even after her death.

Lillian Nassau

Antique dealer Lillian Nassau rekindled the public’s enthusiasm for art deco and art nouveau at a time when Tiffany lamps were being destroyed for their bronze.

Ruth Leah Bunzel

Anthropologist Ruth Leah Bunzel did groundbreaking work on the relationship of artists to their work and on alcoholism in Guatemala and Mexico.

Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago vividly depicted women’s history and women’s experiences through sculpture, paintings, and installation art that involved hundreds of collaborators.

Beatrice Alexander

Beatrice Alexander's sharp business sense and her uncompromising attention to detail made her the most successful and best-loved doll manufacturer of her time.

Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago, born in Chicago in 1939, is an artist, author, feminist, educator, and intellectual whose career now spans four decades. Her most famous work, The Dinner Party, a monumental multimedia project symbolizing the achievements of historic women in Western civilization, has been seen by more than one million people during its 16 exhibitions held at venues in six countries.

Mae Rockland Tupa: Artist and Author

The objects Mae made and the books she wrote helped shape the field of Jewish Americana. Mae’s work, taken as a whole, reflects her view that “just as Jews have become an integral part of the American scene, so can a classical American symbol be used to express a Jewish theme.” A shining example is her hannukiah titled “Miss Liberty”, which is emblazoned with the last lines of Emma Lazurus’s poem “The New Colossus,” and is in the permanent collection of the Jewish Museum in NYC.

Jewish Women in Modern America: Lessons to Live By

Last semester, I was one of four boys in a course at The Weber School dedicated to Jewish women in modern America—a group of people who have had great impact on our lives. However, this group has received little of the public recognition it deserves and is vastly underrepresented in traditional history classes. Like most other American high school students, I have spent the bulk of my academic career studying Christian men from Europe. No wonder that I knew little or nothing about these remarkable women. Yet learning about them is only one reason why this course was so enlightening.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Crafts." (Viewed on March 3, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/crafts>.

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