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Archeology

Hetty Goldman

Working in Greece and Turkey despite the chaos of war, Hetty Goldman patiently uncovered subtle clues to daily life in ancient villages.

Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz’s rapport with her subjects and her genius for posing them in surprising ways has led to some of the most iconic pictures of the twentieth century and has shaped our vision of celebrities.

Gladys Davidson Weinberg

Gladys Davidson Weinberg’s pioneering archaeological work on ancient and medieval glass and its manufacture in the Mediterranean world sheds light on the trade and technology of preindustrial societies.

Helen Tanzer

Contributing to the dissemination of classical and archaeological works, Tanzer well fulfilled the rigorous requirements of scholar and teacher.

Qumran

Any discussion of women in Qumran must needs open with the question of whether there were any. A significant trend in research claims that there were none.

Judith Marquet-Krause

Judith Marquet-Krause was born in Sejera (Ilaniyyah) in the Lower Galilee and died of illness in 1936. She was married to the Orientalist Yves Marquet. Marquet-Krause’s father, Eliyahu Krause (1876–1962), an agronomist, was employed by Baron Edmond de Rothschild and appointed manager of the training farm in Sejera in 1901. In 1914 he was appointed director of the [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:358]Mikveh[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] Israel agricultural school, where his family moved together with him.

Helene, Queen of Adiabene

Helene was the sister and wife of Monabazus Bazaeus, king of Adiabene at the beginning of the first century c.e., who converted to Judaism with other members of her family. Adiabene, a Persian province on the northern extremities of the Tigris River, was at the time a vassal kingdom of the Parthian Empire.

Hetty Goldman

As one of the most distinguished archaeologists of this century, Hetty Goldman was the first woman appointed to direct an archaeological excavation by the Archaeological Institute of America.

Claire Epstein

Claire Epstein was born in London on September 18, 1911, to an upper-class Anglo-Jewish family. Her father, Mordecai Epstein (born Manchester, c. 1890–d. 1946), the son of parents who had migrated from Latvia, was editor of The Statesman’s Yearbook. In 1910 he married Olga, née Oppenheimer (b. Germany 1890?–d. 1971), whose parents had migrated from Germany when she was a child. Olga, a homemaker, was active in WIZO and also in saving Jews from Germany prior to and during World War II. In addition to Claire, they had two sons: Edward Nathaniel, born in 1915, who died in 1992, and (Sir) Anthony, born in 1919.

Trude Dothan

Distinguished archaeologist Trude Dothan was born in Vienna in 1923. Her father, Leopold Krakauer (b. Vienna 1890, d. Jerusalem 1954), was an artist and architect, responsible for some of the finest Bauhaus-style buildings in Jerusalem’s Rehavia garden suburb and elsewhere. Her mother Grete (née Wolf, b. Vienna 1890, d. Jerusalem 1970) was an abstract painter. In 1924 they immigrated to Palestine, where their house in Jerusalem became a meeting place for local intellectuals and artists such as Else Lasker-Schüler and visitors from abroad, such as Stefan Zweig and Alma Mahler.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Archeology." (Viewed on October 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/archeology>.

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