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Olympics

Charlotte Epstein

Charlotte “Eppy” Epstein helped popularize women’s swimming and coached Olympic athletes who broke more than fifty world records.

Gretel Bergmann

High jumper Gretel Bergmann’s Olympic hopes were dashed when Nazi officials both refused to let her leave Germany and refused to let her compete in the 1936 Games.

Muriel Rukeyser

Muriel Rukeyer’s poetry reflected her passionate activism and her belief in confronting the truth of her lived experience.

Nancy Lieberman-Cline

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman-Cline set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Lillian Copeland

Lillian Copeland was the epitome of a strong woman with a remarkable career, first as a record-setting Olympic medalist and later as an officer in the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

Bobbie Rosenfeld

Bobbie Rosenfeld wasn’t just an Olympic medalist, she was quite possibly the most versatile athlete of all time.

Landing the Triple: Female, Israeli, and First

Anya Davidovich, a sixteen-year old girl born in the USA, will be skating for Israel in the Winter Olympics. Her parents are Israeli, and most of her family lives in Israel. She is part of the first-ever pairs team to compete for Israel in the Olympics and the only female member of Team Israel. Anya will be carrying the flag for the Israeli delegation.

Paula Sinclair, JWA Director of Programs & Partnerships, interviewed Anya and her mother as they prepared for their trip to Sochi.

Rena Glickman featured by Sports Illustrated

November 24, 2008

Sports Illustrated features Rena Glickman, the Mother of Woman’s Judo and Recipient of Japan’s Order of the Rising Sun.

The Future Shomer Shabbos Weightlifting Olympian

Last January, a 4-foot, 9-inch bundle of power named Naomi Kutin squatted and focused her considerable energies on the task at hand: hoisting a whopping 214.9 pounds (more than double her own 97 pounds). At the moment of that seemingly impossible lift, beating out her much older competitors, Naomi set a new powerlifting world record for women in her weight class.

Kayla, Rusty, and the "best sport in the world"

When I opened The Boston Globe on Friday morning, I was greeted by a large photo above the fold of a jubilant Kayla Harrison, who had just become the first US judo athlete to win an Olympic gold medal.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Olympics." (Viewed on September 19, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/olympics>.

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