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Mathematics

Shafi Goldwasser

Shafi Goldwasser was honored with the Turing Award, the highest honor in computer science, for her work in revolutionizing the field of cryptography.

Shafi Goldwasser

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Computer scientist Shafi Goldwasser.
Courtesy of the Weizmann Institute via Wikimedia Commons.
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Computer scientist Shafi Goldwasser.

Courtesy of the Weizmann Institute via Wikimedia Commons.

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Hertha Ayrton

The first woman proposed for membership in the Royal Society, Hertha Ayrton created inventions from tools architects used for enlarging and reducing drawings to fans that could clear poison gas from mine shafts.

Olga Taussky-Todd

A self-proclaimed torchbearer for matrix theory, Olga Taussky-Todd made the previously little-known field essential for scientists and mathematicians.

Olga Taussky-Todd, 1932

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Mathematician Olga Taussky-Todd in Göttingen, Germany, 1932.
Courtesy of Konrad Jacobs via Wikimedia Commons.

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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

Mathematician Olga Taussky-Todd in Göttingen, Germany, 1932.

Courtesy of Konrad Jacobs via Wikimedia Commons.

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Emmy Noether

Praised by many, including Albert Einstein, as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, Emmy Noether helped develop abstract algebra and crafted a theorem explaining the connection between symmetry and conservation laws in physics.

Ruth Barcan Marcus

Ruth Barcan Marcus made major contributions to logic, mathematics, and philosophy, arguing with thinkers like Bertrand Russell about the essential nature of names.

Lillian R. Lieber

Frustrated with the way math is taught in schools, Lillian R. Lieber created unconventional, popular books to excite young readers and incite their curiosity.

Scientists

Leaders in the Lab

Nina Fefferman

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Mathematician, biologist, and epidemiologist Nina Fefferman creates mathematical models to predict behavior.
Courtesy of Nina Fefferman

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Mathematician, biologist, and epidemiologist Nina Fefferman creates mathematical models to predict behavior.
Courtesy of Nina Fefferman

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Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Mathematics." (Viewed on May 26, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/mathematics>.

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