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Film

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

Known for her long-time collaboration with Merchant Ivory Films, novelist Ruth Prawer Jhabvala is the only writer to have won both a Booker Prize and the Academy Award for her work.

Falling in Love with Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall was one of the first female actors who showed audiences that female confidence was incredibly attractive. Her characters didn’t need to be saved by the leading man, they could take care of themselves just fine, thanks. There’s a scene in To Have and Have Not, when the police are interrogating her and Bogart, and one of the officers slaps Bacall across the face. She hardly blinks an eye at the attack, doesn’t falter or faint, and doesn’t need someone else to defend her.

Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Vera Gordon

Throughout her long career on stage and screen, Vera Gordon portrayed Jewish mothers in a positive light—with warmth and deep emotion.

Actress Hedy Lamarr patents the basis for WiFi

August 11, 1942

“All creative people want to do the unexpected.” — Actress Hedy Lamarr

Death of film critic Judith Crist

August 7, 2012

“The critics who love are the severe ones. We know our relationship must be based on honesty.” - Movie critic Judith Crist

Death of prima ballerina Melissa Hayden

August 9, 2006

“Blunt honesty and generosity in [Melissa Hayden's] life and dancing, that was her name.”

Selma Diamond

Long before her final role as the grouchy bailiff on Night Court, Selma Diamond earned a reputation behind the scenes as a brilliant, salty comedy writer for some of the best shows on radio and television.

Maya Deren

Maya Deren became one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers of her time for her use of experimental editing techniques and her fascination with ecstatic religious dances.

Natalie Zemon Davis

Through her investigation of court records, pamphlets, and other nontraditional sources, historian Natalie Zemon Davis created vivid pictures of the lives of ordinary people in medieval and renaissance France, particularly in her wildly popular 1983 book, The Return of Martin Guerre.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Film." (Viewed on August 29, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/film>.

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