You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Sculpture

Eva Hesse

Eva Hesse’s innovative sculptures and installations were respected throughout the art world for their dichotomies of lightness and weight, order and chaos, and mechanical and organic forms.

Mary Frank

Mary Frank’s love of dance informed her compelling sculptures and paintings, with their focus on the human body in motion.

Temima Gezari

Temima Gezari made a lasting impact on Jewish education through her vivid artwork and illustrations of children’s books as well as her many years of teaching pedagogy.

Sylvia Goulston Dreyfus

Sylvia Goulston Dreyfus worked to improve Boston both through community activism and through her support of art and music.

Katherine M. Cohen

Defying biblical prohibitions against graven images, Katherine M. Cohen created sculptures that explored Jewish themes and earned respect in both American and European circles.

Sarah Bernhardt

Hailed as “the Divine Sarah” and celebrated around the world for her acting talents, Sarah Bernhardt lived as vivid a life as any character she portrayed onstage.

Hannah Wilke

Hannah Wilke used her art to transform perceptions of the vagina, the nude female form, and her own cancer-ridden body.

Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson transformed the concept of sculpture from an object the audience walks around to a space the audience can enter into.

Ruth Weisberg

Ruth Weisberg’s art helped bring the Reform Movement’s Open Door Haggadah to life with inclusive, feminist imagery.

Helène Aylon

Through her art, Helène Aylon explored the intersectionality among her feminism, the Orthodox Judaism of her upbringing, and her place in a war-torn world.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Sculpture." (Viewed on September 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/sculpture>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs