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Physics

Sulamith Goldhaber

Sulamith Löw Goldhaber’s pioneering work with particle accelerators put her at the forefront of a seismic shift in the research of particle physics.

Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber

During a career limited time and again by her gender, her religion, and her marital status, physicist Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber helped ensure other women scientists would not face the same hurdles.

Marietta Blau

Marietta Blau’s innovations in photographic emulsion allowed scientists to track particles that they had previously only guessed existed.

Fay Ajzenberg-Selove

Fay Ajzenberg-Selove not only made significant contributions to physics, she made huge strides for women by demanding she be judged on her merits, not her gender.

Rosalyn Yalow

Rosalyn Yalow won the Nobel Prize in 1977 for her work in discovering the radioimmunoassay, which uses radioactive isotopes to detect levels of biological and chemical compounds in the human body.

Elsa Neumann

Elsa Neumann earned a doctorate in physics from the University of Berlin in 1899, nine years before women were officially allowed to study there, becoming the university’s first woman graduate.

Women in Science: Reflecting with Dr. Joan Feynman

Dr. Feynman fought an uphill battle—she had the smarts and the ability, but she was living in a world that wasn’t able to support or encourage a woman in science. Realizing the realities of the academic culture, she relegated her ambitions to being an assistant to a male physicist. Luckily for all of us—and for the field of theoretical physics—the support of her brother helped her set her goals at being a “high-medium physicist.”

Death of Elsa Neumann, first female doctoral graduate of University of Berlin

July 23, 1902

Death of Elsa Neumann, first female doctoral graduate of University of Berlin

Women as Wave, Women as Particle: The gender-racial politics of the male-female gaze

Who are you?

I mean really . . .

Who are you . . . when you are alone and no one is watching?

What is your wave state?

Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, 1921 - 2011

A Jewish woman whose father-in-law is a rabbi, who keeps a kosher home, who invites her lab assistants to Passover seders, and worries about them catching colds is not the typical image of a Nobel Prize winner. But it is the image of Rosalyn Yalow, the first woman born and educated in the United States to win a Nobel Prize in a scientific field.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Physics." (Viewed on September 15, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/physics>.

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