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Physics

Steve Benson on the Death of Elsa Neumann

This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.
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This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.

Steve Benson on the Death of Elsa Neumann Thumbnail

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Thumbnail of video. This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.
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JWA use only on jwa.org

Thumbnail of video. This Week in History: On July 23, 1902, Elsa Neumann, the first female doctoral graduate of the University of Berlin, died in a lab accident. Steve Benson describes her struggles to attain her degree, and her work to ensure other women scientists had fewer hurdles to overcome.

Hertha Ayrton

The first woman proposed for membership in the Royal Society, Hertha Ayrton created inventions from tools architects used for enlarging and reducing drawings to fans that could clear poison gas from mine shafts.

Tikvah Alper

Radiobiologist Tikvah Alper, who spent a lifetime questioning accepted theories and the established order, discovered that diseases like scrapie and mad cow replicated without DNA.

Tikvah Alper

tikvah_alper.jpg
Tikvah Alper.
Courtesy of Michael Sterne/Wikimedia Commons.
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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

Tikvah Alper.

Courtesy of Michael Sterne/Wikimedia Commons.

Related content:

Joan Feynman

Astrophysicist Joan Feynman shaped our understanding of solar winds, auroras, and sunspots, and her battle to open scientific bastions to women transformed the field for those who followed.

Joan Feynman

joan_feynman.jpg
Joan Feynman.
Courtesy of NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
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Public Domain

Joan Feynman.

Courtesy of NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

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Vera Cooper Rubin

Far ahead of her time, Vera Cooper Rubin theorized that galaxies clustered and moved in ways that defied the Big Bang Theory, and helped prove the existence of dark matter.

Emmy Noether

Praised by many, including Albert Einstein, as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, Emmy Noether helped develop abstract algebra and crafted a theorem explaining the connection between symmetry and conservation laws in physics.

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Physics." (Viewed on May 3, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/physics>.

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