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Technology

GamerGate: Why We All Lose

Let’s face it, admitting you’re a gamer right now will probably invite more horror and social stigma than at any time since the 1980s.

Scientists

Leaders in the Lab

Actress-Scientists

Stars of STEM and Screen

Hedy Lamarr

Hailed by director Max Reinhart as “the most beautiful woman in Europe,” actress Hedy Lamarr also patented what would become a key component of wireless technology.

Sulamith Goldhaber

Sulamith Löw Goldhaber’s pioneering work with particle accelerators put her at the forefront of a seismic shift in the research of particle physics.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

Miranda Bloch

Miranda “Randy” Bloch not only served as a Marine during World War II, she was one of the rare women Marines to be issued flight orders, helping pilots and air crew train for radar bombing runs.

Judith Resnik

The second female American astronaut to travel into space, Judith Resnik is remembered for her death in the tragic Challenger explosion.

Living by Their Own Codes

Women who make history rarely feel the need to adhere to others' narratives—and that goes double for Jewish women.  So it's not surprising that when Radia Perlman, architect of many of the routing and bridging protocols that make the modern Internet possible, discusses her childhood, she casually disposes of the standard geek-culture heroic origin story: "I did not fit the stereotype of the 'engineer.' I never took things apart or built a computer out of spare parts."  Irene Greif, a fellow computer scientist who brought ethnographers, anthropologists and sociologists into systems design through her field of computer-supported cooperative work, cheerfully admits: "I have a whole history of always choosing marginal roles and in marginal subjects of research and so on for myself."  Her work, though, has turned out to be anything but marginal. 

MIT’s Shafi Goldwasser wins “the Nobel Prize in computing”

June 15, 2013

MIT’s Shafi Goldwasser Wins “the Nobel Prize in Computing”

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Technology." (Viewed on November 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/technology>.

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