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Soviet Jewry

Feiga's Choice: Tracing One Family's History of Resilience from South Africa to Ukraine

Tess Peacock comes from a long line of strong Jewish women. As a South African human rights attorney, she believes passionately in equality and dignity for all. It’s a value she learned from her mother, Judy Favish—a former anti-apartheid activist now on staff at the University of Cape Town where she works to ensure equal access to education for all.  Judy’s mother was a pioneering doctor working in the townships. Her father Mannie was an attorney known for his integrity, compassion, and pursuit of fairness.

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild

Sylvia Rosner Rothchild used her writing talents to turn oral history interviews with Holocaust survivors and Russian refuseniks into engaging accounts that challenged stereotypes and captured American mainstream audiences.

Nora Levin

While her books sparked controversy among historians, Nora Levin helped shape popular understanding of modern Jewish history.

Aline Kaplan

As executive director of Hadassah, Aline Kaplan credited the organization’s success to the commitment of its volunteers, whose numbers grew to a staggering 370,000 during her tenure.

Shoshana S. Cardin

Shoshana S. Cardin’s persistent negotiation with world leaders helped ensure the release of Russian refuseniks from the Soviet Union and helped secure resources for them to build new lives after emigrating.

Marillyn Tallman

Marillyn Tallman helped Jews make new lives for themselves during some of the most monumental conflicts of the twentieth century.

Galina Nizhnikov Veremkroit

Galina Nizhnikov Veremkroit risked her own safety to become one of the first female refuseniks to protest for the right to leave Soviet Russia.

Shannie Goldstein

Shannie Goldstein used her creativity to outsmart the KGB, bringing information to and from refuseniks in the Soviet Union.

Roz Garber

Roz Garber evaded the KGB to bring hope to refuseniks in the USSR.

Pamela Cohen

Called “the general of a fighting army” by jailed dissident Natan Sharansky, Pamela Cohen rescued countless refuseniks from Soviet Russia with her grassroots efforts.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Soviet Jewry." (Viewed on November 27, 2015) <>.


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