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Science

Lydia Rapoport

Lydia Rapoport’s contributions to crisis theory transformed how social workers and therapists handle crisis intervention.

Sophie Rabinoff

Sophie Rabinoff used the skills she honed as a doctor in Palestine to improve health care in some of the worst slums in New York.

Hortense Powdermaker

Anthropologist Hortense Powdermaker used her experiences of anti-Semitism and “passing” to offer new insights into how societies manage tensions between insiders and outsiders.

Judith Graham Pool

Physiologist Judith Graham Pool revolutionized the treatment of hemophilia by isolating factor VIII and creating a concentrate made from blood plasma that could be frozen, stored, and used by hemophiliacs in their own homes.

Virginia Morris Pollak

Virginia Morris Pollak’s artistic career and her longtime community service collided in WWII when she used her deep understanding of clay, plaster, and metal to revolutionize reconstructive surgery for wounded servicemen.

Seraphine Eppstein Pisko

As executive secretary and vice president of the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives in Denver, Seraphine Eppstein Pisko was one of the first women to lead a national Jewish institution.

Hellen Harris Perlman

Helen Harris Perlman pioneered the “Chicago School” of social work, arguing that many people in crisis needed short-term therapy and solutions rather than long-term Freudian analysis.

Jessica Blanche Peixotto

Jessica Blanche Peixotto defied convention and her family to become a respected authority in the field of economics.

Berta Ottenstein

Despite repeatedly needing to restart her career when she fled from Nazi-held territories, Berta Ottenstein earned great respect for her pioneering research in the field of dermatology.

Emmy Noether

Praised by many, including Albert Einstein, as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, Emmy Noether helped develop abstract algebra and crafted a theorem explaining the connection between symmetry and conservation laws in physics.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Science." (Viewed on January 29, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/science>.

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