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Science

Roberta Galler, 1936 - 2014

As a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) staff member, Roberta Galler was among hundreds arrested in Jackson, Mississippi in June 1965 protesting local attempts to subvert implementation of the new Voting Rights Act. After being thrown into the Hinds County Jail, Roberta first encountered the Jackson Jewish community in the form of Rabbi Perry Nussbaum. A quiet civil rights supporter against his congregation’s wishes, Nussbaum came into the cell housing Roberta and several other Jewish women.

Martha Tamara Schuch Mednick

Both through her psychological research and through her collaboration with African–American, Israeli, and Arab women scholars, Martha Tamara Schuch Mednick helped long–silenced minorities express their experiences.

Jessie Marmorston

Jessie Marmorston’s research into hormone secretion led to breakthroughs in our understanding of the ways stress can contribute to heart attacks and certain cancers.

Ruth Barcan Marcus

Ruth Barcan Marcus made major contributions to logic, mathematics, and philosophy, arguing with thinkers like Bertrand Russell about the essential nature of names.

Margaret Mahler

Margaret Schönberger Mahler pioneered theories on child development and abnormal psychology that impacted generations of psychiatrists.

Fannie Eller Lorber

When her community became a mecca for adults suffering from tuberculosis, Fannie Eller Lorber created a Jewish children’s home for those who had no one else to care for them.

Lillian R. Lieber

Frustrated with the way math is taught in schools, Lillian R. Lieber created unconventional, popular books to excite young readers and incite their curiosity.

Lena Levine

From the 1930s through the 1950s, Lena Levine used her medical and psychological training to offer women advice on everything from birth control to intimacy issues.

GamerGate: Why We All Lose

Let’s face it, admitting you’re a gamer right now will probably invite more horror and social stigma than at any time since the 1980s.

Fania Mindell arrested for distributing birth control material.

October 26, 1916

Fania Mindell, Margaret Sanger, and Ethel Byrne opened the first birth control clinic in the United States in Brooklyn in 1916.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Science." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/science>.

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