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Zionism

Shulamit Aloni, 1928 - 2014

When Shulamit Aloni, one of Israel’s first feminist leaders, presented a bill protecting women from domestic violence, some of her male fellow MKs mocked her. “Go back to the kitchen and get me a cup of coffee,” some of the men said, laughing, as they dismissed the seriousness of her work.

Kadya Molodowsky

One of the brightest stars of the Yiddish literary world, Kadya Molodowsky defied categorization—advocating for both Yiddish and Zionist culture, refusing to be defined as “just” a woman writer—all while crafting a staggering body of acclaimed poems, stories, and essays.

Charlotte Lipsky

Charlotte Schacht Lipsky found an unusual balance between activism and pragmatism: on the one hand, a follower of the revolutionary Emma Goldman, on the other, the owner of a successful interior decorating business.

Nora Levin

While her books sparked controversy among historians, Nora Levin helped shape popular understanding of modern Jewish history.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Lotta Levensohn

Lotta Levensohn helped found Hadassah and later played a pivotal role in the organization’s history as an independent organization for Zionist women.

Sara Lee

As director of the Rhea Hirsch School of Education at Hebrew Union College, Sara Lee helped transformed day schools, Hebrew schools and other Jewish institutions.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

Sarah Kussy

With seemingly limitless energy, Sarah Kussy helped found and lead a variety of major Jewish organizations like Hadassah, the United Synagogue’s Women’s League, and Young Judea.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Zionism." (Viewed on December 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/zionism>.

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