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Education

Stephanie Pollack Named MA’s First Female Secretary of Transportation

January 13, 2015

"I saw the law as one tool that could be used to improve the world, what we Jews call tikkun olam." - Stephanie Pollack

Yavilah McCoy

Yavilah McCoy is the founder of Ayecha, a nonprofit Jewish organization that provided Jewish diversity education and advocacy for Jews of color in the United States.

Margarethe Meyer Schurz

Margarethe Meyer Schurz used the training she gained in Germany to create the first kindergarten in the United States.

Eva Schocken

As the daughter of Salman Schocken, founder of Schocken Books, Eva Schocken pushed the publishing company to the forefront of both education and women’s studies.

Colette Roberts

Colette Roberts helped shape our understanding of modern art both through her art criticism and through her unconventional teaching methods, bringing students into artists’ studios to talk with them about their work.

The Seditious Student: Small Steps to Rebellion

I do not break rules. I color inside the lines, a textbook example of a goody two-­shoes. This is mainly because I am afraid of what will happen if I am caught breaking the rules. More specifically, I am afraid of the question of “why.” I like to have reasons for everything that I do, and so a question like, “Why did you hop that fence?” or “Why did you eat ice cream for breakfast?” leave me feeling like a complete deer in the headlights. 

Sophie Rabinoff

Sophie Rabinoff used the skills she honed as a doctor in Palestine to improve health care in some of the worst slums in New York.

Jane Prince

As president of the Women’s League for Palestine (later called the Women’s League for Israel), Jane Prince helped provide housing and education for young refugee women.

Ellen Phillips

Ellen Phillips helped shape generations of Jewish children as a founder of the Hebrew Sunday School Society, the first to offer lessons on Jewish religion and culture in English to both boys and girls.

Judith Peixotto

A gifted teacher who tirelessly promoted her students both within their schools and in the larger world, Judith Peixotto was appointed the first Jewish principal in the city of New York in 1849, at age 24.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Education." (Viewed on March 3, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/education>.

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