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Economics

Daphni Leef inspires Occupy Israel

July 14, 2011

"I felt for a long time that I had lost my voice, and I feel that I am getting it back." - Activist Daphni Leef

Theresa Wolfson

Theresa Wolfson’s career led her down two parallel paths as a labor activist and as an educator of both college students and workers.

Helen Suzman

As the lone member of the Progressive Party for thirteen years of her 36-year career in the South African parliament, Helen Suzman questioned the apartheid government and served as an important ally of Nelson Mandela.

Sylvia Field Porter

Sylvia Field Porter, known for her clear, straightforward writing and wise advice, broke ground as the first woman to write the financial section of a big-city newspaper.

Linda Lingle

Linda Lingle became the second Jewish woman to be elected a US governor when she became governor of Hawai’i in 2002.

Gertrude Himmelfarb

Gertrude Himmelfarb railed against the moral relativism and social-science-based work of the “New Historians” and argued for a return to the values of the Victorian era.

Barbara Boxer

Barbara Boxer earned a reputation as a powerful voice for liberal causes by leading the charge on issues like sexual harassment, the Iraq War, and marriage equality.

Ruth Messinger

As a politician, Ruth Messinger served her community, but in leading American Jewish World Service, she has found ways for her community to help repair the world.

How Poverty Became a Women’s Issue

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty, a government response to a national poverty rate around 19%. Back then, the face of poverty in the States was those living in inner-city projects or Appalachian shacks. Today the face of poverty is women.

According to Maria Shriver (on the Atlantic), of the more 100 million Americans living close to or under the poverty line, nearly 70% are women and children. Forget having it all; these women just want to be able to feed their kids and pay their electric bill.

Reality check: Wage gap for Jewish professionals worse than national average

Much to the dismay of a number of Jewish organizations, the Senate neglected to vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act last month, effectively shelving it for the foreseeable future. The bill, which would have augmented current civil rights law to protect against sex-based pay discrimination, had received broad support from civil rights and women’s rights groups but faced opposition from business organizations, whose members said it would be both difficult and expensive to enforce.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Economics." (Viewed on August 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/economics>.

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