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Midwifery

Rosa Fineberg

1966.003.033.jpg
Midwife Rosa Fineberg.
Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, donated by Pearl Bagan.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Midwife Rosa Fineberg.

Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, donated by Pearl Bagan.

Related content:

Lena Nemerovsky Kenin

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Lena Nemerovsky Kenin.
Courtesy of University of Oregon Medical School.
Rights
Creative Commons (attribution)
Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen
Lena Nemerovsky Kenin.
Courtesy of University of Oregon Medical School.

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Elizabeth D.A. Cohen

elizabeth_da_cohen.jpg

Doctor Elizabeth D.A. Cohen (1820-1921).

From the National Library of Medicine.

Rights
Public Domain

Doctor Elizabeth D.A. Cohen (1820-1921).

From the National Library of Medicine.

Related content:

Hannah Sandusky

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Hannah Sandusky.
Photo courtesy of the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Hannah Sandusky.

Photo courtesy of the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center.

Related content:

Hannah Sandusky

Called “the angel” and “the saint” by her patients, midwife Hannah Sandusky was remarkable both for the sheer number of births she oversaw and for the respect that male doctors granted her for her skills.

Alice Bailes

Alice Bailes joined the resurgence of natural childbirth in America both as a midwife and as coeditor of The Handbook on Home Birth.

Lena Barber

One of the few midwives to continue working in Baltimore after the 1924 ordinance that required they be licensed and registered, Lena Barber kept detailed records of hundreds of her deliveries.

Rosa Fineberg

Rosa Edelhurst Fineberg kept detailed records of her work as a midwife that shed light on the lives of Jewish immigrants at the turn of the century.

Elizabeth D. A. Cohen

Called a midwife and a “doctoress,” as she fought for the respect of her colleagues, Elizabeth D. A. Cohen became the first woman doctor recognized by the state of Louisiana and battled to save patients from two epidemics of yellow fever.

Sheryl Baron Nestel

Sheryl Baron Nestel’s activism in the childbirth reform movement led to her investigation of how race and racism affect healthcare.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Midwifery." (Viewed on May 28, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/midwifery>.

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