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Feminism

Amy Swerdlow

An active member of Women Strike for Peace and founder of Women’s History Month, Amy Swerdlow created opportunities for ordinary women to become agents of change.

Nancy Spero

Rejecting postwar trends towards Pop art and abstract impressionism, figurative artist Nancy Spero instead drew inspiration from tribal totems in Chicago’s Field Museum.

Getting Girls Educated

Western feminists have a habit of writing about and advocating for “first world” issues: body image, television and gaming tropes, the wage gap, you name it. It’s logical to be most concerned with the society in which you live and on which you have the most influence, and there’s nothing wrong with this reality. 

Joan Feynman

Astrophysicist Joan Feynman shaped our understanding of solar winds, auroras, and sunspots, and her battle to open scientific bastions to women transformed the field for those who followed.

JWA Writer Leah Berkenwald Wins Blogging Award

June 11, 2012
JWA blogger Leah Berkenwald made “connections between the themes of freedom and equality in the most widely read story of her generation to the movement for equal rights for women and resistance to bigotry in a clear, energetic and youthful voice.”

Jiggling Toward Inclusivity

This Girl Can is a nonprofit based in the UK that “is here to inspire women to wiggle, jiggle, move and prove that judgment is a barrier that can be overcome.” In their main video campaign, women of all races, shapes, and ability levels are featured exercising and enjoying themselves. They are proud of who they are and are proud of their active lifestyles.

The Feminine Mystique: Betty Friedan, A Generation of Readers, and You

The story of The Feminine Mystique is of course the story of Betty Friedan, but it is also the story of every woman, young and old, who read the book and came away from it a changed person. This week, we celebrate the anniversary of its landmark publication in 1963, and its profound impact on the budding feminist movement of the time, as well as on subsequent generations of readers.

Lesley Gore’s “You Don’t Own Me” Climbs Billboard Charts

February 1, 1964
"I don’t care what age you are—whether you’re 16 or 116—there’s nothing more wonderful than standing on the stage and shaking your finger and singing, ‘Don’t tell me what to do.’” - Singer Lesley Gore

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman

Sylvia Bernstein Seaman fought for women’s suffrage as a teenager, then became an important voice for second wave feminism as the first person outside the medical profession to write about breast cancer.

Size Zero, Flawless Skin

I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen a woman with a pimple on the cover of a magazine. I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen a woman with small breasts or a big stomach in an advertisement. The only time I’ve ever seen a woman in an ad with even slightly dry skin is in a “before” image.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Feminism." (Viewed on March 5, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/feminism>.

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