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Judaism-Conservative

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I remember my excitement upon hearing about Yeshivat Maharat’s  ordination of women. As a supporter of female Jewish leadership in all of its forms, I was thrilled at the idea. Evidently, Jessica Cavanagh-Melhado, a contributor to JWA’s blog, felt the same way. In June 2013, she wrote a piece entitled, We Begin to Become a Multitude. In the piece, she describes her experience attending the first ever ordination of women as open Orthodox female spiritual leaders. 

Naomi Levy

After suffering tragedies in her own life, Naomi Levy used her skills as a rabbi and writer to give others the tools to move on.

Gesa Ederberg

The first woman rabbi to serve in Berlin since Regina Jonas, Gesa Ederberg has played an essential role in restoring Jewish life in Germany.

Julie Schonfeld

In 2009, Rabbi Julie Schonfeld became the first female leader of an American rabbinical organization, serving as executive vice president of the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical Assembly.

Julie Schonfeld

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Rabbi Julie Schonfeld.
Courtesy of The Rabbinical Assembly.
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JWA use only on jwa.org

Rabbi Julie Schonfeld.

Courtesy of The Rabbinical Assembly.

Related content:

Mathilde Schechter

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Mathilde Schechter.
Courtesy of CJ: Voices of Conservative/Masorti Judaism.
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JWA use only on jwa.org

Mathilde Schechter.

Courtesy of CJ: Voices of Conservative/Masorti Judaism.

Related content:

Deborah Marcus Melamed

Deborah Marcus Melamed encouraged Jewish women to form their own relationship with Jewish practice through her 1927 book The Three Pillars, an interpretive guide to rituals and customs.

Fanny Binswanger Hoffman

As the chosen successor of Mathilde Schechter, Fanny Binswanger Hoffman focused the National Women’s League’s efforts on Jewish education for children and greatly expanded the organization’s membership and reach.

Amy Eilberg and Sally Priesand

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(From left to right): Amy Eilberg and Sally Priesand.

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JWA use only on jwa.org

(From left to right): Amy Eilberg and Sally Priesand.

Adele Ginzberg

Known as “Mama G.” and “Mrs. Seminary,” Adele Ginzberg helped her husband, Louis Ginzberg, create a warm atmosphere at the Jewish Theological Seminary and helped lay the groundwork for women’s greater inclusion in Conservative Judaism.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Judaism-Conservative." (Viewed on May 1, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/judaism-conservative>.

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