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Immigration

Alice Davis Menken

A descendent of prominent families whose American roots traced back before the Revolutionary War, Alice Davis Menken devoted her career to helping immigrant women and children get a fresh start.

Irma May

During the economic devastation of the 1920s, Irma May reported on anti–Semitism throughout Eastern Europe and raised massive funds to help Jews overseas.

Emma B. Mandl

Emma B. Mandl created and led vital institutions for Jewish European immigrants in Chicago, from orphanages to trade schools to tuberculosis wards.

Minnie Low

At a time when social work usually meant wealthy people donating to the poor, Minnie Low pushed for new kinds of aid such as vocational training and loans that made the needy self–sufficient.

Minnie Dessau Louis

Minnie Dessau Louis helped immigrant Jewish women find real success in America through the many and varied schools she ran.

Johanna Loeb

Johanna Loeb’s work with both Jewish and secular charities strengthened the safety net for the poor, the sick, and new immigrants throughout Chicago.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

Josephine Lazarus

After the death of her famous sister Emma, Josephine Lazarus emerged as a writer and activist in her own right.

Lillian Kasindorf Kavey

Lillian Kasondorf Kavey helped immigrants escape Eastern Europe by cutting the red tape that prevented their relatives from saving enough money to bring them to America.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Immigration." (Viewed on December 19, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/immigration>.

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