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Immigration

Katharine Engel

Katherine Engel helped the massive wave of European Jewish émigrés after WWII resettle and adjust to life in the US. Engel graduated Smith College in 1920 and did graduate work at Oxford before marrying Irving M. Engel, a human rights lawyer, in 1926.

Rose Gollup Cohen

Through her moving 1918 autobiography, Out of the Shadow, Rose Gollup Cohen offered a vivid account of her life as an immigrant Jewish woman in the sweatshops of New York.

Rose Brenner

As president of the National Council of Jewish Women, Rose Brenner focused on inclusion of people who were often marginalized—the deaf, the blind, and those isolated in rural areas.

Golde Bamber

Responding to a massive influx of Eastern European immigrants, Golde Bamber created schools and settlement house programs to teach the new arrivals the skills they needed to assimilate and succeed in America.

Anzia Yezierska

Anzia Yezierska turned the frustrations and indignities she suffered in New York’s tenements into novels and short stories that depicted the lives of Jewish immigrants.

Hannah Sandusky

Called “the angel” and “the saint” by her patients, midwife Hannah Sandusky was remarkable both for the sheer number of births she oversaw and for the respect that male doctors granted her for her skills.

Lena Barber

One of the few midwives to continue working in Baltimore after the 1924 ordinance that required they be licensed and registered, Lena Barber kept detailed records of hundreds of her deliveries.

Rosa Fineberg

Rosa Edelhurst Fineberg kept detailed records of her work as a midwife that shed light on the lives of Jewish immigrants at the turn of the century.

Matilda and Bernice Blaustein

While 150,000 women eventually served in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in World War II, Matilda Blaustein was remarkable both as one of the first to volunteer and because she was joined in the service by her daughter, Bernice.

Esther Brandeau

The first Jew known to set foot on Canadian soil, Esther Brandeau disguised herself as a boy to gain freedom and independence.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Immigration." (Viewed on July 29, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/immigration>.

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