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Immigration

Emma B. Mandl

Emma B. Mandl created and led vital institutions for Jewish European immigrants in Chicago, from orphanages to trade schools to tuberculosis wards.

Minnie Low

At a time when social work usually meant wealthy people donating to the poor, Minnie Low pushed for new kinds of aid such as vocational training and loans that made the needy self–sufficient.

Minnie Dessau Louis

Minnie Dessau Louis helped immigrant Jewish women find real success in America through the many and varied schools she ran.

Johanna Loeb

Johanna Loeb’s work with both Jewish and secular charities strengthened the safety net for the poor, the sick, and new immigrants throughout Chicago.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

Josephine Lazarus

After the death of her famous sister Emma, Josephine Lazarus emerged as a writer and activist in her own right.

Lillian Kasindorf Kavey

Lillian Kasondorf Kavey helped immigrants escape Eastern Europe by cutting the red tape that prevented their relatives from saving enough money to bring them to America.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

N. May Karff

May Karff made her mark in the traditionally male bastion of professional chess as the first woman champion of the United States in 1938.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Immigration." (Viewed on November 26, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/immigration>.

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