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Journalism

Fredrica Wechsler 1929 - 2014

My mother was a remarkable woman.   She grew up at 71 Ocean Parkway, an only child, with my beloved Grandma Rebecca and Grandpa Joe and although she nearly flunked math at Erasmus High in Brooklyn, she went on to become the night editor at the University of Michigan’s Michigan Daily after convincing her parents that she wanted to go all the way to the Midwest for college. After all, once my grandparents had arrived from Poland and Finland respectively in the earlier part of the twentieth century, why did she need to go so far away?

Yael Arad

Yael Arad celebrated an unprecedented victory in 1992 when she won the Olympic silver medal for judo, making her the first Israeli Olympic medalist for any sport.

Annie Londonderry

A symbol of women’s growing independence at the turn of the twentieth century, Annie “Londonderry” Kopchovsky became the first woman cyclist to circle the globe in 1895.

Dana Jacobson

Dana Jacobson has showed resilience in her career as a sportscaster, transitioning from television to radio while remaining a trusted female anchor in a male-dominated field.

Bonnie Bernstein

One of the most accomplished female sportscasters in history, Bonnie Bernstein combines her role as on-air journalist with her work behind the scenes as vice president of Campus Insiders, a leading media platform for college sports.

Vera Paktor

In her too-short life, Vera Paktor reached unprecedented heights for a woman in maritime law, forging regulations for new developments in the shipping industry.

Margarete Muehsam-Edelheim

When Margarete Muehsam–Edelheim’s efforts to secure women’s rights to practice law in Germany failed, she turned her talents to journalism, editing periodicals ranging from the legal section of a Berlin newspaper to the Leo Baeck Institute’s newsletter.

Mary Moss

Despite living at home with her parents for much of her life, Mary Moss lived a vivid existence through the lives she investigated as a journalist and the ones she invented in her fiction.

Susan Stamberg

In 1972 Susan Stamberg became America’s first female full-time anchor of a national nightly news broadcast as one of the original co-hosts of NPR’s All Things Considered.

Jane Eisner

In 2008 Jane Eisner became editor-in-chief of the Forward, making her the paper’s first female head in its 111-year history.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Journalism." (Viewed on January 31, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/journalism>.

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