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Journalism

Leslie Feinberg, 1949 - 2014

I was in an alleyway in Chicago the first time someone told me about Stone Butch Blues. “You’ve got to read this book,” she said. “Stone Butch Blues.” The “she” in question was an older Femme (they always were), and the name of the book got right under my skin. I can remember the feeling: My ears perked up, head tilted back, eyes focused. Stone Butch Blues, I thought. Ok. I was sixteen years old, had been out since I was fourteen, and had been a tomboy all my life.

Margot Adler, 1946 - 2014

Margot was seven and a half years my senior and, with the exception of a few gaps, she’s always been a part of my life. There is some reason to believe that we met when I was less than one year old and again when I was 10. However, our real friendship began when I was 13 and she 20.

For years, we were inseparable. When she got married, we still spent time together, although we had less contact as she and John raised their son.

Anita Diamant

Both through her writing and through her work as founding president of Mayyim Hayyim, Anita Diamant has breathed new life into Jewish midrash and rituals.

Geraldine Brooks

Geraldine Brooks had a stellar career as a foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, but it was her 2005 novel March which won her the Pulitzer Prize.

Kadya Molodowsky

One of the brightest stars of the Yiddish literary world, Kadya Molodowsky defied categorization—advocating for both Yiddish and Zionist culture, refusing to be defined as “just” a woman writer—all while crafting a staggering body of acclaimed poems, stories, and essays.

Penina Moïse

Penina Moïse shaped Jewish culture through her poetry as the first woman poet included in an American prayer book.

Ellen Moers

While early critics attacked Ellen Moers’s 1976 book Literary Women for its exclusive focus on women writers, her analysis of Mary Shelley and other women writers reshaped our understanding of their work.

Miriam Michelson

Miriam Michelson used her writing to celebrate the lives of strong, unconventional women, from thieves and miners to the queen of England.

Eve Merriam

Eve Merriam mingled poetry for children with devastating social criticism for adults, like her Inner City Mother Goose, which became one of the most banned books of all time.

Vladka Meed

Freedom fighter Vladka Meed smuggled dynamite into the Warsaw Ghetto to aid the Jewish uprising and helped children escape by hiding them in Christian homes.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Journalism." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/journalism>.

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