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History

Honoring the Real First Woman Rabbi

For nearly thirty years I have had the good fortune to carry the title “first woman rabbi ordained in the Conservative Movement.” I have carried the designation with pride, at the same time knowing that I was a relative newcomer to the world of “first women rabbis.” After all, Rabbi Sally Priesand (the first woman Reform rabbi, ordained by the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1972) and Rabbi Sandy Sasso (the first woman Reconstructionist rabbi, ordained by the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in 1974) had preceded me by many years. Only this week did I come to know my forbear, Rabbi Regina Jonas, the first woman ever ordained a rabbi.

Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Peggy Guggenheim

Marguerite “Peggy” Guggenheim amassed one of Italy’s most important modern art collections despite the chaos of WWII.

Tatyana Grosman

Tatyana Grosman helped make American printmaking a respected medium through Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), the studio and publishing house she founded in 1957.

Haika Grosman

From Zionist leadership in war-wracked Europe to her career in the Israeli Knesset, Haika Grosman displayed uncommon strength of character and steadfastness to her ideals.

Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

Emma Leon Gottheil

As a translator, Emma Leon Gottheil helped spread the ideals of Zionism across America, but as founder of the Women’s League for Palestine, she helped turn those ideals into practical reality.

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman

Jeane Herskovits Gottesman helped raise essential funds for Jewish organizations ranging from Yeshiva University to Hadassah’s Youth Aliyah program, which helped save Jewish children from Europe during the Holocaust.

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld

Bessie Goldstein Gotsfeld helped organize American Mizrachi Women (now known as AMIT), pushed for its independence from men’s groups, and made aiding children in Israel a major goal of the organization.

Hetty Goldman

Working in Greece and Turkey despite the chaos of war, Hetty Goldman patiently uncovered subtle clues to daily life in ancient villages.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "History." (Viewed on August 2, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/history>.

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