You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

History

Whose Labor Day Is It Anyway?

Ron Ashkenas’ recent post for Forbes about Labor Day has me feeling unsettled, and I finally know why. In his article, Ashkenas explains that the “real purpose [of Labor Day] was to serve as a tribute to the working class — the men and women whose physical, and largely manual, labor had built the country.” He goes on to bemoan (as we have in the past) how the meaning of Labor Day has been lost in end-of-summer soirees and all-American barbeques. So far, I’m totally onboard with his argument. We should find more meaningful ways to commemorate the people who built this country, brick by brick.

Helen Joseph

Called the “grandmother of American puppetry“ for her definitive history of puppets and marionettes, Helen Haiman Joseph was also known for her own practice of the craft as a talented designer and director.

Tziporah H. Jochsberger

Having escaped the Holocaust on the strength of her musical talents, Tziporah H. Jochsberger went on to use music to instill Jewish pride in her students.

Laura Margolis Jarblum

Laura Margolis Jarblum’s deft management of wartime social services on three different continents for the Joint Distribution Committee saved the lives of thousands.

Marie Jahoda

Marie Jahoda was a major figure in psychology for her work on the effects of unemployment on emotional well-being as well as the social impact of McCarthy-era blacklisting.

Jean Jaffe

Jean Jaffe’s career was doubly remarkable: she was a field reporter at a time when women were usually relegated to the society pages and a Yiddish-language journalist at a time when most American reporters wrote in English.

Anna Jacobson

Anna Jacobson fought to continue teaching German language and literature at Hunter College throughout the 1930s and 1940s, at a time when many schools suppressed all things German.

Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

Rose Gell Jacobs

Rose Gell Jacobs led Hadassah through the early days of WWII, overseeing the organization’s shift from creating medical services in Palestine to rescuing thousands of Jews from war-torn Europe.

Lotte Jacobi

A fourth-generation photographer, Lotte Jacobi became known for capturing her subjects, no matter how famous or iconic, in honest, unguarded moments.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "History." (Viewed on September 2, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/history>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs