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Music

Jennie Tourel

Opera singer Jennie Tourel’s subtle performances may not have been suited to huge concert halls, but her extraordinary interpretations of the varied roles she took on made her recordings highly prized collector’s items.

Sylvia Blagman Syms

A jazz saloon singer with a gift for connecting with her audiences, Sylvia Blagman Syms continued performing despite ill health and was praised as one of the greats by performers that included Billie Holliday, Frank Sinatra, and Duke Ellington.

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand’s outsized personality, combined with her voice and acting talents, made her one of the most successful performers of the twentieth century.

Beverly Sills

Beverly Sills may not have performed at the Metropolitan Opera House until age forty-five, but her impact on the opera world as both a singer and as the first female director of the New York City Opera Company (NYCO) was beyond measure.

Dinah Shore

Dinah Shore was one of the top recording artists of the 1940s, with hits like “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” before starting a new career in the 1970s as a talk show host who prized conversation over confrontation.

Mathilde Schechter

Mathilde Roth Schechter was both an essential support for her husband’s work as president of the Jewish Theological Seminary and a force in her own right as founder of the Women’s League.

Betty Robbins

Betty Robbins spent her life breaking gender boundaries in the Jewish community even before she made history as the first woman cantor in 1955.

Roberta Peters

Roberta Peters made a remarkable debut at the Metropolitan Opera which led to a career spanning more than half a century as one of the Met’s most popular sopranos.

Bette Midler

Unapologetically bawdy, Bette Midler used elements from earlier brassy entertainers like Sophie Tucker in her comedy and music, but with a style that was all her own.

Sophie Maslow

Sophie Maslow blended classical, modern, and folk traditions in her dance and choreography and drew inspiration from politics and modern folk music to create vibrant new pieces that engaged audiences in new ways.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Music." (Viewed on November 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/music>.

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