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Wendy Wasserstein

Wendy Wasserstein

In 1989, Wendy Wasserstein not only won the Pulitzer Prize for The Heidi Chronicles, she became the first woman playwright to win a Tony Award.

Dear Wendy

When I was 15 years old, I was about to go on vacation with my grandparents and I needed a book. I picked up a collection of three of your plays (The Heidi Chronicles, Uncommon Women and Others, & Isn't It Romantic) that I’d been assigned to read for my ninth grade English class, but never gotten around to studying. I didn’t know anything about you or the plays before opening the book, but I was soon transported to a world of women who didn’t necessarily know exactly what they wanted out of their educations, careers, and relationships, but did know they wanted a great deal. Suffice to say, it greatly appealed to me.

Making Trouble: Clips from the Cutting Room Floor

While hard at work here at the Archive, I stumbled upon some interviews that ended up on the cutting room floor during production of our prizewinning documentary “Making Trouble”. Take a look at a few clips that feature fabulous Jewish women in entertainment talking about fabulous Jewish women in entertainment.

See Tovah Feldshuh speak about the ahead of her time Sophie TuckerAlex Borstein explore Gilda Radner's beauty,  Adrienne Cooper's take on Molly Picon gender roles, and Wendy Wasserstein's thoughts Jewish entertainers on and off the stage. 

Wendy Wasserstein: Center stage

I miss Wendy Wasserstein. How much so? Well, when Hillary Clinton announced she was running for president, my second thought—right after “All right!”—was: “What would Wendy say?”.

And the winner is ... no one?

The 2010 winner of the $25,000 Wendy Wasserstein Prize for playwriting is apparently nobody.

Wendy Wasserstein, 1950 - 2006

Most of the remembrances and reflections that have been published since the death of playwright Wendy Wasserstein on January 30, 2006 praise her for giving voice to the experience of the women of her generation. In an interview conducted last year, on behalf of the Jewish Women's Archive, by filmmaker Joan Micklin Silver, Wasserstein conveyed her deep commitment to portraying that experience.

What "Making Trouble" means to me

If you follow JWA on Twitter or Facebook, it should be pretty obvious that we think Making Trouble, the film about six trailblazing Jewish women entertainers, makes a great Hanukkah present for the whole family.  Normally, the idea of pushing a "product" makes me queasy.  Afterall, I chose to work for a non-profit, not an advertising firm!  So I feel that I owe the JWA audience a real and honest explanation for why I think Making Trouble is something you should own.

Wendy Wasserstein first woman playwright to win Tony Award

June 4, 1989

Wendy Wasserstein became the first woman playwright to win a Tony Award for Best Play, for "The Heidi Chronicles."

Theater in the United States

For over a hundred years, Jewish women have been involved in the American theater as writers, actors, directors, designers and producers. The vitality of the Yiddish theater, the splendor of Broadway, the rich tapestry of the regional theater—and everything in between—all owe a debt to the Jewish women who have given of their talents, their energy, their drive, and their dreams.

Wendy Wasserstein

In 1989, with her play The Heidi Chronicles, she won a Pulitzer Prize and became the first woman to receive the Tony Award for Best Play.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Wendy Wasserstein." (Viewed on November 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/15957>.

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