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Social Work

Rose Brenner

As president of the National Council of Jewish Women, Rose Brenner focused on inclusion of people who were often marginalized—the deaf, the blind, and those isolated in rural areas.

Clarice Baright

Clarice Baright was one of the first women admitted to the American Bar Association and the second woman to become a magistrate in New York City.

Sophie Cahn Axman

Sophie Cahn Axman became known as “the angel of the Tombs” for her work as a probation officer helping troubled children.

Frances Stern

In her belief that better nutrition could improve the lives of working-class people, Frances Stern created institutes, schools, and books to teach children and adults how to eat healthy on a budget.

Rebekah Bettelheim Kohut, cropped

kohut-rebekah-cropped.png
Rebekah Bettelheim Kohut.
Courtesy of the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives and Bachrach Bros.

Rebekah Bettelheim Kohut.

Courtesy of the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives and Bachrach Bros.

Joanna Eckstein

Joanna Eckstein widened the perspective of Seattle residents both with her travel writing and as a patron of the arts who supported individual artists and museums.

Alice Lillie Seligsberg

Alice Lillie Seligsberg dedicated her life to caring for orphans, first in America and then in Israel.

Anne Lapidus Lerner

Both through her scholarship and through her service as the first woman vice chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, Anne Lapidus Lerner helped make women’s studies an important sub-discipline of Jewish studies.

Phyllis Greenberger on the Society of Women's Health Research

Phyllis Greenberger talks about the Society of Women's Health Research and lack of women participants in clinical trials.

Rights
Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

Phyllis Greenberger talks about the Society of Women's Health Research and lack of women participants in clinical trials.

Randi Abramson on Joining the Medical Field and Working with the Poor

Randi Abramson talks about her career choice of joining the medical field, becoming a physician, her responsibilities as she was influenced by the women's movement, and working with the poor.
Rights
Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

Randi Abramson talks about her career choice of joining the medical field, becoming a physician, her responsibilities as she was influenced by the women's movement, and working with the poor.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Work." (Viewed on February 13, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/social-work>.

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