Women's Rights

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Adeline Schulberg

Adeline Schulberg’s long and winding career path led her from activist to Hollywood agent and back again.

Alice Salomon

Alice Salomon was honored as one of the founding mothers of social work in Germany for both the direct service organizations she created and her role as founding president of the International Association of Schools of Social Work.

Fredrica Wechsler, 1929 - 2014

My mother was no shrinking violet. After a few weeks at home following the wedding, she got a job at the Gary Welfare Department, where she went on home visits and discovered Gary’s devastatingly impoverished African-American community. I am sure that this was a pivotal moment for her—and she never turned back.

Anita Pollitzer

As a party organizer for the National Woman’s Party, Anita Pollitzer travelled across the country to earn crucial support for ratifying the Nineteenth Amendment.

Harriet Fleischl Pilpel

As general counsel to both Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union, Harriet Fleischl Pilpel helped shape the arguments for reproductive rights in the years leading up to Roe v. Wade.

Alicia Suskin Ostriker

Alicia Suskin Ostriker’s award-winning poetry and groundbreaking literary criticism are profoundly shaped by her feminist activism.

Rivka Haut, 1942 - 2014

Rivka got me to other agunah rallies, including a pitiful one with five other women circling the tiny front yard of a Manhattan brownstone. It was my last agunah rally but not Rivka’s. She never gave up and never turned down a request for help. For her, it was about justice and compassion, not numbers.

Shulamit Aloni, 1928 - 2014

Aloni spearheaded an ideology in which feminism is a lens for social equality across all social sectors. Her work with Palestinians was informed by her feminism, and her feminism was informed by her work with Palestinians. She held on to a world view in which equality and compassion were part of the process of learning to see the “other” in society, whether that “other” was distinguished by gender, ethnicity, religion, or anything else.

Birth of Victorian painter Rebecca Solomon

September 26, 1832

"That Rebecca Solomon was among the first Jewish women artists, if not the first, makes her career and artwork even more important.”

Pearl Bernstein Max

Pearl Bernstein Max directed the staggering work of fusing four different colleges—City, Hunter, Brooklyn, and Queens—into the City University of New York.

Anna Margolin

Under the name Anna Margolin, Rosa Lebensboim wrote what critics called some of the finest Yiddish poetry of the earliest twentieth century.

Emma B. Mandl

Emma B. Mandl created and led vital institutions for Jewish European immigrants in Chicago, from orphanages to trade schools to tuberculosis wards.

Theresa Serber Malkiel

Theresa Serber Malkiel fought for workers’ rights, becoming the first female factory worker to rise to leadership in the Socialist Party.

Minnie Low

At a time when social work usually meant wealthy people donating to the poor, Minnie Low pushed for new kinds of aid such as vocational training and loans that made the needy self–sufficient.

Rebecca Pearl Lovenstein

Rebecca Pearl Lovenstein became the first woman lawyer allowed to practice in Virginia in 1920 and went on to create a state bar association for women.

Sophie Irene Simon Loeb

At a time when widowed mothers often had no way to support their children, Sophie Irene Simon Loeb helped create support systems for needy children and their mothers.

Charlotte Lipsky

Charlotte Schacht Lipsky found an unusual balance between activism and pragmatism: on the one hand, a follower of the revolutionary Emma Goldman, on the other, the owner of a successful interior decorating business.

Clara Lipman

Clara Lipman based her long and successful career as an actress and playwright on her ingénue performances and her gift for light comedy.

Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

Margaret Seligman Lewisohn not only gave generously to education causes, as the head of the Public Education Association she helped make the community as passionate about education as she was.

Ruth Lewinson

Ruth Lewinson, one of the first female Jewish lawyers in America, both worked in private practice and gave public lectures on practical law to help people better navigate the legal system.

Jennie Davidson Levitt

Jennie Davidson Levitt continued her family’s tradition of activism and philanthropy with her work for Jewish organizations, including resettling Jewish refugees during and after WWII.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Birth of Harriet Fleischl Pilpel, pioneer for the right to privacy and free speech

December 2, 1911

Lawyer Harriet Fleischl Pilpel provides the historical link between birth control activist Margaret Sanger and feminist Betty Friedan.

Jan Schakowsky

Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky has earned a reputation as a liberal progressive for her stances on issues ranging from health care to marijuana legalization.

Susan Davis

Congresswoman Susan Davis, the first Democrat in more than fifty years to serve more than one term for California’s 53rd district, has repeatedly fought for women’s health issues on both a state and local level.
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