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Natural Science

To Girls Taking Their First STEM Classes

If you’re a female-identifying teen and you attend high school, chances are good that you take, or will take, a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) class. Physics, biology, and chemistry are the usual suspects. We’re writing to share some collective wisdom with you from our own high-school experience.

Malka Kolodny

Malka Fisz Kolodny served as one of the first teachers in pre-State Palestine, at a time when teaching often involved counseling traumatized war orphans.

Clara Immerwahr

As the wife of Fritz Haber, the father of chemical warfare, and a scientist in her own right, Dr. Clara Immerwahr made the ultimate protest of her husband’s work by committing suicide.

Clara Heyn

In her work on Leguminosae (a family of plants that includes peas and legumes), Clara Heyn named several new species and helped scientists better understand the variety of plants native to Israel.

Elisabeth Goldschmidt

Elisabeth Goldschmidt worked on the cutting edge of genetics, doing research and offering counseling on inherited diseases in the Jewish community.

Rosalind Elsie Franklin

Although her work formed the basis for Watson and Crick’s discovery of DNA, Rosalind Franklin was denied credit for decades.

The Social Justice and Science Superwoman: Tikvah Alper

Few women have been both scientists and social justice activists in their lifetimes. Both of these roles are time-consuming and challenging, yet somehow Tikvah Alper succeeded as a distinguished radiobiologist and as a fierce opponent to the apartheid in South Africa. She faced much opposition as a woman, but still managed to have a significant impact in both of these spheres.

Naomi Feinbrun-Dothan

Naomi Feinbrun-Dothan helped pioneer the scientific analysis of native Israeli flora and establish the study of botany and genetics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Edith Bulbring

Physiologist Edith Bülbring was so frustrated by the unpredictable responses of smooth muscle tissue in the lab that she made them her life’s work, becoming one of the most respected experts in her field.

Batsheva Bonne-Tamir

By studying both isolated and mixed populations in Israel, Batsheva Bonne-Tamir uncovered the genetic histories and relationships between long-separated communities.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Natural Science." (Viewed on November 20, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/natural-science>.

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