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Holocaust

Everything Is…Complicated

I love reading Jewish literature. Seeing my culture and experience come to life on the pages of a book can be meaningful and validating; it makes my idiosyncratic religious practices feel normal, and real. The representation and recognition of Judaism in popular culture is crucial, but what do you do when the author gets it wrong? 

Lonka Korzybrodska

Lonka Korzybrodska’s bravery, charm, and genius for languages meant that she could trick Germans and Poles into transporting all manner of goods for the Jewish resistance during the Holocaust.

Rozka Korczak-Marla

Rozka Korczak-Marla was one of three leaders of the Vilna Ghetto uprising, which, astonishingly, ended with successful escapes rather than mass executions.

Sarah Kofman

Philosopher Sarah Kofman argued that the ideas of great thinkers couldn’t simply be taken on their abstract merit, they had to be considered in the context of those philosophers’ lives.

Reizia Cohen Klingberg

Although Reizia Cohen Klingberg had never been political, the Nazi invasion of Poland inspired her to risk her life as a freedom fighter.

Vitka Kempner-Kovner

Zionist Vitka Kempner-Kovner helped found the United Partisan Organization (FPO) in the Vilna Ghetto and struck a blow for freedom by blowing up a Nazi train.

Agnes Keleti

A promising gymnast, Agnes Keleti survived the Nazi invasion of Hungary and won the most medals of any athlete at the 1956 Summer Olympics.

Hannah Karminski

When the Nazi regime dissolved the feminist organization to which Hannah Karminski had devoted her life, she found new ways to serve the German Jewish community by saving children and providing aid for families.

L'Dor Vador: Lessons from my Grandmother

My grandmother, Marguerite, was born in Paris in 1937 to Polish parents, Fania and Adam. Shortly after her birth, the family moved to Jarnac, a tiny village in southwestern France. The family was Jewish, though they were not observant. Regardless, after the fall of the Third Republic in 1940, it became dangerous for them to even speak of their religion. 

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on September 26, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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