Sculpture

Content type
Collection

Vered Nissim

Multi-disciplinary artist, curator, and art consultant Vered Nissim was born in Israel to Iraqi immigrant parents. She identifies as a Mizrahi feminist; her art revolves around her gender, ethnic, and class identities, and she aims to give voice to marginalized women in Israeli society.

Audrey Flack

The only female member of the founding group of photorealists, New York-born painter and sculptor Audrey Flack is especially recognized for the feminine content in her art. Her feminist sensibilities manifest in both her pioneering paintings, which often consider stereotypes of womanhood, and her sculptures, frequently depicting goddesses and other strong female figures. Flack’s work appears in prominent collections around the world.

Mirta Kupferminc

Mirta Kupferminc (b.1955) is an internationally recognized contemporary Argentine Jewish artist. For the past four decades, she has explored memory, culture, history, and language, in a variety of art media.

"TALIT"

A Fringe of Her Own: An Interview with Tamar Paley

Judith Rosenbaum

If women had a say in the creation of these ritual objects, how would they look and feel? I began by trying to figure out how women around me today are experiencing their spirituality. And as a jewelry designer, I was also thinking about how this material feels on the body, where it is worn ...

Pathways to Freedom Kiosk

Passover, Freedom, and Public Art: An Interview with Julia Vogl

Judith Rosenbaum

Artist Julia Vogl travels the world, transforming public spaces into works of art that reflect the shared experiences of the local community while embuing those spaces with strikingly vibrant color and patterns.

Gloria Steinem and Linda Stein, Suited Up (cropped)

Diving into the Wreck with Linda Stein

Bella Book

Imagine my surprise when I encountered the equivalent of an androgynous rubber suit embodied in the sculpture of artist/activist Linda Stein. Unlike Rich’s suit, which is confined to the page, Stein’s art is tangible. In fact, some of these sculptures are wearable.

Janet Indick

Janet Suslak Indick incorporates Jewish themes and inspiration from the natural world into her sculptures and medallions.
"The Three Musicians" Sculpture by Sam Cashwan

Art and America-A Letter to Senator Rob Portman

Tess Kelly

When things get tough, art is usually one of the first things to suffer, but today, I’m asking you to vote in favor of allocating funding for the arts in the federal budget this year.  

Linda Stein

In crafting sculptures that incorporate concepts of weaponry, armor, and the female form, Linda Stein has found new ways to consider issues of power, violence, and protection.

Chloe Wise

Chloe Wise uses her art to comment on consumer culture, most famously through her Bread Bags series, which creates purses made of realistic-looking bakery items, adorned with the straps, logos, and hardware of designer bags.

Hanna Stiebel

Hanna Nosovsky Stiebel used her background in dance to create graceful, dynamic outdoor sculpture installations.

Birth of sculptor Louise Nevelson

September 23, 1899
“If an object is in the right place, it is enhanced to grandeur." - Sculptor Louise Nevelson

Ruth Weisberg

Ruth Weisberg’s art helped bring the Reform Movement’s Open Door Haggadah to life with inclusive, feminist imagery.

Amalie Rothschild

A well-known painter and sculptor, Amalie Rothschild discovered her penchant for drawing while still a young child.

Sculptor and performance artist Hannah Wilke is born

March 7, 1940

"My heart is hard to handle, my art is too.” Sculptor Hannah Wilke

Birth of Sally Lilienthal, founder of Ploughshares Fund

March 19, 1919

A spunky child expelled from a tony private school for passing a note in class that contained dirty words.  A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College who grew up in a family where “there was some k

War memorial by Bashka Paeff dedicated in Kittery, Maine

May 31, 1926

On May 31, 1926, a bas-relief bronze and granite memorial to the sailors and soldiers from Maine who died in World War I was dedicated in the coastal town of Kittery.

Beverly Pepper and Carol Gilligan

Women who frame our world

Elizabeth Stone

Who are the women who frame our world? A small gathering of about 100 women met in San Francisco last week to hear from an array of leaders in the creative arts.

Sarah Gettleman Silberman, 1909 - 2008

I didn’t pay much attention to this tiny little old lady. Then came a student show, and she brought in her Bust of Henry Lofton, a twice life-size study of an 11-year-old African American boy. That’s all I had to see to know that I was sharing a studio with an exceptional talent.

First solo show for sculptor Louise Nevelson

September 22, 1941

Louise Nevelson, one of the most important American sculptors of the twentieth century, was born on September 23, 1899, in Kiev, Russia.

Louise Nevelson stamps issued by US Postal Service

April 6, 2000

On April 6, 2000, the United States Postal Service issued five stamps honoring and depicting the work of sculptor Louise Nevelson.

Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson belongs to a generation of Manhattan-based painters and sculptors whose careers coincided with the development of modernism in America. Nevelson created sculptures that audiences could both experience and see. Several of her pieces are now owned by the Whitney, the Brooklyn Museum, and MOMA.

Teresa Żarnower (Żarnoweröwna)

One of the most important artistic personalities of the Polish constructivist avant-garde in the 1920s, Teresa Żarnower founded the first Polish constructivist artistic group, “Blok,” and also edited the magazine of the same title. While pioneering the field of avant-garde art, she was also actively involved in left-wing politics, designing election posters and two-party leaflets.

Hannah Wilke

The body is omnipresent in the work of artist Hannah Wilke. The nude body and its self-representation became the vehicle by which Wilke exposed personal, political, and linguistic themes. Her work continues to influence the complex art of postmodern artists today.

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam Schapiro helped pioneer the feminist art movement, both through her own pushing of creative boundaries and by creating opportunities for other women artists. Starting in 1970, Schapiro raised women’s consciousness through her writing, painting, printmaking, teaching and sculpture. She lectured extensively on feminist issues to professional conferences, university audiences, art classes and women’s groups.

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