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Painting

The Art of Gender Representation

The words to SZA’s “Drew Barrymore” ring in my ears as I write this; the song serves as an anthem for the teen angst and insecurities I’ve been feeling since I got home from school today. Feeling lonely, feeling like I’m not living up to the standard of female beauty: SZA articulates the thoughts that have been running through my mind.

Painting Courage and Painting History

Marlis Glaser, a German artist, grew up in rural Germany, not knowing any Jews or her father’s previous involvement with the Nazi party. Glaser was introduced to a German Jewish woman who had survived the Holocaust. Now, Glaser has shaped her art around Judaism, and recently converted. Her colorful work includes hundreds of portraits of Holocaust survivors, their families, and other Jewish figures throughout history.

Diving into the Wreck with Linda Stein

Imagine my surprise when I encountered the equivalent of an androgynous rubber suit embodied in the sculpture of artist/activist Linda Stein. Unlike Rich’s suit, which is confined to the page, Stein’s art is tangible. In fact, some of these sculptures are wearable.

Gluck

The gender nonconforming painter Gluck, who refused categorization in all things, was known for her spare, evocative paintings of flowers, prizefighters, landscapes, and even rotting fish.

Broncia Koller-Pinell

Resisting the idea that serious artists were single, poor, and above all, male, expressionist painter Broncia Koller-Pinell insisted her work be taken on its merits.

Hedda Sterne Protests the “Monster National Exhibition.”

May 20, 1950
“I never thought in terms of a career, but I worked with tremendous urgency." - Artist Hedda Sterne

Adele Bloch-Bauer

A wealthy socialite and salon hostess in her day, Adele Bloch-Bauer became the center of an historic legal case when her niece demanded the return of her portrait, stolen by the Nazis.

Tina Blau

Inspired by Dutch masters and by the quality of light she found in the natural world on trips to Holland and Italy, Tina Blau became the only Jewish woman artist of her generation to be recognized by her peers.

Felicie Bernstein

Felicie Rosenthal Bernstein was as famed for her salons as for her art collection, both of which helped bring an appreciation for modern art to Berlin’s high society.

Three by Three: Making Art a Priority

Clutching a tray of two teacups, Elizabeth leads me upstairs to the study. We sit next to a tall bookshelf and she reaches towards the far right, where thick volumes are bound in hues of navy, emerald, and charcoal, with titles like The Great Alone and Time and Tide. They are the types of books that belong in a study. She slides one off the shelf, sets it on her lap, and opens it up. The book has no pages. In fact, it’s not a book at all, but a box, filled with two stacks of three by three-inch cards, separated by a divider down the middle.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Painting." (Viewed on July 15, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/painting>.

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