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Painting

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Collection

Lea Nikel

Lea Nikel, one of the central pillars of Israeli painting, had more than fifty years of magnificent creativity to her credit. She belonged to no art group or movement and over the years did not change her distinctive style, even when new styles became fashionable.

Mela Muter

Mela Muter was the first professional Jewish woman painter in Poland. Her portraits, landscapes and still life reveal the influence of major artistic currents of the turn and beginning of the century: synthetism of École de Pont-Aven, van Gogh’s expressionism, French fauvism, cubism. Yet her work was entirely individual, both in its subject matter and in the formal means which she employed.

Regina Mundlak

Looking at the reproductions, one might conclude that Regina Mundlak was interested in nothing but Jewish life in the Diaspora. Her passion in presenting Jewish merchants, craftsmen, women, children, men, hasidim, and old people studying Talmud is almost documentary.

Dorothea Litzinger

An artist best known for her paintings of flowers, Dorothea Litzinger also painted landscapes, decorative screens, and panels. It is not apparent that her work reflected any connection with her Jewish background: Her choice of subject matter was completely in concert with acceptable norms for upper-class women who painted. In her art and social milieu, Litzinger appears to have lived a highly assimilated life. In the artist’s file at the New York Public Library there is an invitation, dated March 1923, from Messrs. Kennedy and Company at 693 Fifth Avenue to a “special Easter Exhibition of decorative flower and landscape paintings by Dorothea Litzinger.” She was also involved in civic and community issues, and served as chair of the executive committee of the Beekman Hill Association. In that capacity, she was credited with organizing neighborhood children in a campaign for “sanitary streets.”

Paola Levi-Montalcini

Twin sister of Rita Levi-Montalcini, the 1986 Nobel Prize winner for physiology, and the sister of architect Gino (b. 1902), Levi-Montalcini trained as a painter in Turin (1928–1929) in the atelier of Felice Casorati (1883–1963), where the Jewish Giorgina Lattes was also among the pupils. These were the years during which a number of artists who had attended Casorati’s atelier started the so-called “Group of Six,” which drew inspiration from French Impressionism and opposed the “retour à l’ordre” promoted by the Novecento Italiano movement, initially supported by Mussolini. However, Levi-Montalcini shaped her own direction, her indebtedness to Casorati consisting of a moral engagement rather than a style. In fact, as she recalled in an interview of March 1991, she derived from him only “the geometrical structure and the architecture of figures.”

Ilona Kronstein

Ilona (Ili) was born in Budapest, the eldest of three daughters of Sigmund (Zsiga) Neumann and Emma, née Deutsch. Though she had shown an artistic talent from childhood on, her early work was ridiculed and discouraged by her father.

Joyce Kozloff

One of the founders of the Pattern and Decoration movement in America in the 1970s, Joyce Kozloff is an internationally recognized painter, public muralist and feminist whose long-term passions have been history, culture and the decorative and popular arts.

Lee Krasner

The first Krassner born on American soil, Lee Krasner would go on to forge other family firsts, female firsts, and artistic firsts.

Doris Barsky Kreindler

Vigorous, rapid, and exciting use of the palette knife is not usually associated with women painters in any era, but Doris Barsky Kreindler’s abstract expressionist works in the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, inspired by Hans Hofmann, were exceptional.

Gertrud Kraus

Gertrud Kraus, the “first lady” of modern expressionistic dance in Israel, was born in Vienna on May 5, 1901.

Beryl Korot

Beryl Korot is an internationally known video artist who has created multimonitor installations which have been shown all over the world. She is best known for her multiple channel works Dachau 1974 and Text and Commentary, 1977, and her two collaborations with composer Steve Reich, The Cave and Three Tales, both of which brought video art into a theatrical context with contemporary classical music.

Broncia Koller-Pinell

Broncia Koller’s daughter, Silvia Koller, Saul Pineles supported her mother’s artistic aspirations. At the age of eighteen Broncia Koller began private studies under the sculptor Josef Raab (?–1883) and after his death in 1883 continued under the painter Alois Delug (1859–1930).

Rose Kohler

Rose Kohler was a multitalented woman who was known as an accomplished painter and sculptor. She was a teacher in, and later the chair of, the National Council of Jewish Women’s religious schools in Cincinnati, Ohio, and wrote many articles on art and religion.

Elena Kabischer-Jakerson

Elena Kabischer, a graphic artist, painter and sculptor was born on March 23, 1903 in Vitebsk into the family of a craftsman. In 1916 she started studying in the private School of Drawing and Painting managed by Yehuda Pen (1854–1937), the oldest of Vitebsk painters, among whose pupils were also Marc Chagall (1887–1985) and Eliezer Lisitsky (1890–1941).

Ira Jan

Ira Jan (the professional name of Esphir Yoselevitch), a painter and writer, was the first Hebrew artist in pre-State Palestine. She was born on February 2, 1868 in Kishinev, the capital of Moldavia.

Barbara Honigmann

Barbara Honigmann, who was born in East Berlin on February 12, 1949, is the most distinguished German-Jewish writer of the generations born after the Holocaust. Her father, Georg Honigmann, Ph.D. (1903–1984), who was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, emigrated to Great Britain in 1933 but later returned to the GDR, where he was a prominent journalist and film producer. Her mother, Alice (née Kohlmann, 1910–1984), was born in Vienna and emigrated to Great Britain in 1934. She worked in film dubbing. The couple divorced in 1954.

Eva Hesse

Eva Hesse is recognized as one of the most innovative and potent artists to emerge in New York in the fertile 1960s. She created new sculptural forms in such eccentric materials as latex and fiberglass, and has become known for giving minimal art organic, emotional, and kinetic aspects. Her material and formal inventions, with their sensuous and emotional extremes, were balanced by an active verbal intelligence that won her the respect of the art community—as her warmth and wry humor won her many friends.

Ruth Gikow

Ruth Gikow reached maturity as an artist during the heyday of abstract expressionism, yet she remained committed to a figurative art that, she believed, reflected the humanity of her subjects and was both politically and socially relevant.

Temima Gezari

Artist and innovator in Jewish art education, Temima Gezari was born Fruma Nimtzowitz in Pinsk, Russia, on December 21, 1905.

Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler's constant high achievement ranks her as one of the most important contributors to the history of postwar American painting.

Mary Frank

At a time when figurative work has not been an artistic imperative, Frank imparts a sense of the timeless and elemental to her work, placing her among the foremost figurative artists of our time.

Lee Weiss Frank

Community leader, artist, newspaper drama critic, and host of a popular radio program in Philadelphia, Lee Weiss Frank was born in Newton Falls, Ohio, on May 16, 1899, the elder of two daughters born to Adolph and Eugenia (Guttman) Weiss.

Celia Dropkin

The explicitly sexual imagery and themes of Celia Dropkin’s poems redefined the ways modern Yiddish poetry could depict relationships between women and men. Beautifully crafted lyrics, Dropkin’s poems undo the poetic conventions implicit in their very forms and, with their anger and passion, call into question societal assumptions about love. These poems open up a woman’s psyche in a voice that sounds contemporary in the 1990s. Even her poems about depression, about mother love, and about nature are infused with erotic energy. Best known for her poetry, Dropkin also published short stories and was an accomplished visual artist.

Stella Drabkin

In her 1938 self-portrait, Stella Drabkin depicts herself with extraordinarily large eyes, widened to take in the world. Some thirty years later, in a haiku to accompany the multitype Birds of Prey, she wrote, “The eye of the eagle sees what you do not … aware as the artist.” The application of the artist’s eye was the constant in Stella Drabkin’s varied undertakings as painter, printmaker, mosaicist, and author.

Friedl Dicker-Brandeis

More than half a century after the death of Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, researchers from many countries and from diverse disciplines began to express a new interest in her, focusing respectively on her paintings, furniture and stage designs, and her teaching in Theresienstadt (Terezin), a ghetto established by the Germans in Czechoslovakia.

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