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Education

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Sephardi Women in the Dutch Republic

In the early modern period, Dutch Sephardim formed a community famous for its wealth, grandeur, and benevolence.

The article highlights the social, economic and religious position of Sephardi women in the Dutch Republic, arriving as immigrants from persecutions by the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions and their offspring, settled in generations afterwards. Their adjustment to normative Judaism is being discussed as well as their professional education and their contributions to Sephardi and Dutch society.     

Rivka Carmi

Rivka Carmi is a medical geneticist, neonatologist, pediatrician, the first woman to be appointed president of an Israeli university (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev), and a feminist trailblazer who broke the glass ceiling for women in academia.

Ruth Behar

Award-winning cultural anthropologist Ruth Behar has conducted groundbreaking research in Spain, Mexico, and her native Cuba. Her innovations in cultural representation have transformed ethnographic writing and reached a broad, non-academic audience through her film, poetry, personal essays, and young adult fiction.

Figures in Conversation, with a Coffee Mug Patterned Background

Solidarity Through Conversations About Privilege

Ella Thompson

As a mixed-race Jewish woman, I’m no stranger to discussions about privilege.

Topics: Activism, Education
Background of Figures in Profile; Figure with Megaphone in Forefront

Lessons From Andrea Dworkin: On Creating the Feminist Movement We Need

Lily Pazner

Dworkin didn’t try to make feminism trendy or more appealing; instead, her contributions were biting, radical, and definitely controversial.

Emma Mordecai

Emma Mordecai (1812-1906) navigated direct challenges to her Jewish faith and to her southern ideals by remaining loyal to both. She responded to the Civil War, which stirred antisemitism in the South and especially threatened Richmonders, with renewed commitments to Judaism and to the ideals of the Old South.

Cecilia Klaften

Cecylia Klaften, a pedagogue and a civic activist from Lvov (Galicia/Eastern Lesser Poland), implemented social reform projects and especially promoted the founding of vocational schools for women in interwar Poland. In the 1920s she was one of the founders of the Jewish Women’s Association and the WIZO Jewish Women’s Organization for Pro-Palestinian Work in Lvov. In the 1930s she was politically active for Lvov’s City Council.

Hannah Floretta Cohen

Hannah Floretta Cohen was the first woman president of Britain’s traditionally male Jewish Board of Guardians for Jewish Poor Relief. She also promoted many other Jewish and non-Jewish charitable organizations to promote women's education, to benefit the sick and the elderly, and to encourage investment in the Palestine Mandate, through her public speaking, financial expertise, and administrative skills.

Juliette Pary

Born in Odessa, Juliette Pary moved to Paris in 1925 and became a respected translator, journalist, and author. She also played important roles in summer camps, youth hostels, and the development of modern educational practices. During World War II she worked closely with child refugees.

Detective stock photo

A JWA Scavenger Hunt

Dina Adelsky

Participate in JWA's virtual scavenger hunt, and explore the stories of Jewish women from history.

Topics: Education, Family
Folded Road Map

Road Map to Combatting Injustice

Mica Maltzman

The second pin on this road map is moving beyond research to action. I should use my voice to speak up; but I cannot speak for everyone. 

Topics: Activism, Education
Student Sitting Behind Books

A Tutor's Privilege

Ella Plotkin-Oren

Working as a tutor opened my eyes to a privilege I didn’t even know I had.

Topics: Education
Open book with flipping pages. Black background.

Confronting White Privilege: A Reflection on Affirmative Action

Ari Fogel

As I learned more about what affirmative action really means for students, my worries turned into a sobering recognition of my privilege.

Pencil with sharpener resting on a notebook.

Magnet School

Maddy Pollack

If tikkun olam is something that we believe in fully, then our work will not be complete until every student is empowered with an equitable education.

Checklist, checked boxes with a pink highlighter.

Checked Boxes

Shoshanna Hemley

I’ve been told that, because I’m not white and because I’m queer, I don’t have to stress about college applications.

Miriam Rykles in her office, 1968

Knocking on Harvard's Glass Ceiling

Elana Spivack

In 1962, Miriam Rykles applied to work in Harvard University’s physics department. This is her story.

Topics: Education, Physics
Wherever we live is our homeland

Aunt Bev and Me: Jewish Women at a Women’s College

Sophie Hurwitz

This Friday, as I host a social justice-themed Shabbat dinner, I’ll be thinking of Aunt Bev.

Topics: Education, Family
Emma Cohn at Social Justice Conference

Post-It Note Privilege

Emma Cohn

Recognizing your own privilege for the first time is deeply disquieting. It can feel like you’re doing something wrong, or as if you can’t participate in social justice efforts because you benefit directly from the oppression of others. And those feelings may never fully go away, but that’s okay.

Topics: Activism, Education
Julia Clardy's Three Grandmothers

My Personal Imahot

Julia Clardy

When it comes to grandmothers, I hit the jackpot. My grandmothers are some of the strongest and most incredible women I’ve ever met, and because I come from a blended family, I have three of them! My grandmothers are models of power and grace, and they haven’t sacrificed their passions and values as they’ve aged. They’re all fierce defenders of justice, and I am who I am today largely because of their influence.

Rising Voices Fellows attending a retreat seminar (Winter 2018)

Combating Bullying and Exclusion

Larisa Klebe

When the status quo simply isn’t acceptable, our Rising Voices Fellows step in. In addition to being activists, they are just some of the mensch-iest people you’ll ever meet, and they don’t take things like bullying or exclusion lightly. From working to make youth group more open and inclusive, to refusing to take part in school bullying, these young women teach us the importance of sticking to good values, no matter the risk or cost.

Anna Charny

Anna Charny and her family were a prominent part of the refusenik community in Moscow, working with various Jewish organizations that advocated for and provided economic support to refuseniks.
Rising Voices Fellows in their feminist t-shirts

Strengthening School Communities

Larisa Klebe

Our Rising Voices Fellows are active members of their high schools who work to strengthen and positively contribute to these communities. From combating negativity and unkind behavior with positive messages, to making school a more environmentally conscious place, these young women are taking the lead in shaping and bettering their school communities.

Henrietta Szold and Julia Aronson Travel to Palestine aboard the Guiseppe Verdi, 1920

Make America Great Again

Emily Cataneo

I love the past. I have not one but three typewriters. I had a penchant for corsets in high school and now will dress as a flapper any chance I get. I can’t stop reading about the Romanovs, or about 1920s Berlin when life was a cabaret, or about those secretly tawdry Victorians.

Charlie Baker

Support the Millionaire Tax: No Ifs, Ands, or Bakers

Katy Ronkin

I am writing you this letter to urge you to support the “Millionaire Tax” that was recently passed by the state legislature. By supporting this tax, you would show the people of Massachusetts that you are committed to ending income inequality in our state, and that you believe that the wealthiest among us should pay their fair share. 

Topics: Education, Economics
Rising Voices Fellow Lili Klayman and Family

A Woman And Her Journey To Better A Community

Lili Klayman

My grandmother Elaine Fallon was born in 1938 and grew up in Brookline, Massachusetts. Social activism has played a major role throughout her life, even though her involvement started later than one would expect. Since her introduction to feminism and activism, Elaine has been a key figure in voicing the importance of education throughout her community. 

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