Painting

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Selma Waldman, 1931 - 2008

Waldman's activism manifested itself in her Jewish identity... She believed that the experience Jews had had in the world gave a very powerful link to work for tikkun olam, for social justice and peace, and fighting oppression. Though she considered herself a secular humanist and never belonged to a synagogue, she had a very strong network in the grassroots of the Jewish community and really believed in the power and beauty of Jewish culture and experience.

Renaming, Reclaiming

by  Leah Berkenwald

Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism, an current exhibition at The Jewish Museum in New York, explores the influence of feminism on Jewish painting from the 1960s to the present.

Topics: Feminism, Art, Painting

Happy birthday, Frida Kahlo!

by  Judith Rosenbaum

Today would have been the 102 birthday of Frida Kahlo, the painter famous for her striking self-portraits and her marriage to Diego Rivera (not to mention her impressive eyebrows). Though she came to be known for her representations of Mexican life and was, in fact, referred to as La Mexicana -- the quintessential Mexican woman -- her work often explored issues of identity and its hybridity, informed by her own experience as the daughter of a German Jewish immigrant father and a Mexican Catholic mother.

Topics: Painting

Artist Frida Kahlo born

July 6, 1907

Frida Kahlo, well known for her striking self-portraits, her strong Mexican and feminist sensibilities, and her tumultuous passionate life, was born in Coyoacan, Mexico, on July 6, 1907.

Opening of "Too Jewish?" exhibit featuring work of artist Helène Aylon

March 10, 1996

Helène Aylon's The Liberation of G-d was first shown in the New York Jewish Museum's Too Jewish?: Challenging Traditional Identities

Joan Snyder

A true Expressionist and feminist in her life and art, this veteran painter uses the broadest possible palette to paint the canvas of her life.

Nacha Rivkin

Orthodox Jewish education for women in America began with the work of Nacha Rivkin, a founder of Shulamith School for Girls, the first girls’ yeshiva in the United States.

Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson belongs to a generation of Manhattan-based painters and sculptors who were born at the close of the nineteenth century and whose careers spanned the twentieth, coinciding with the development of modernism in America.

Art: Representation of Biblical Women

In narratives or abridged cycles more or less faithful to the biblical text, art has portrayed biblical women as role models and reference, occasionally adding exegetical elements both Christian and Jewish. Although the text of the Bible became fixed at different dates and in various versions, these images are not fixed, but reflect the ebb and flow in society’s attitudes towards women and their role.

Hannah Wilke

The body is omnipresent in the work of Hannah Wilke. Her typically nude body and its self-representation became the vehicle by which Wilke exposed personal, political, and linguistic themes. Like the work of her feminist peers of the 1970s, Wilke’s art has often been oversimplified by critics, yet it continues to influence the complex art of postmodern artists today.

Aviva Uri

Aviva Uri has become engraved in our memory as a woman who realized her life as an artist, a gifted draftswoman whose work touched the roots of her existence and influenced an entire generation of artists. In the course of fifty years of creation she engaged only in drawing, uncompromisingly and without an iota of faking, and established her central place in the history and the language of Israeli art.

Marie Trommer

Marie Trommer was an early twentieth-century writer, poet, artist, art critic, and contributor to American Jewish newspapers.

Anna Ticho

From her first small, hesitant sketches to her forceful renditions in her own special earthy coloration, Anna Ticho’s art, like Jerusalem itself, hovers between symbol and reality.

Florine Stettheimer

The career of Florine Stettheimer, painter, poet, and designer, offers an alternative to prevailing modes of contemporary modernist painting.

Irma Stern

For Irma Stern, one of South Africa’s most outstanding artists, Africa was her “Paradise,” the intellectual and emotional mainspring of her artistic creativity. She occupies a unique place in the history of modern South African art and her works are to be found in many galleries and public collections in South Africa and abroad.

Nancy Spero

Nancy Spero was a figurative artist concerned with difference and the representation of the body.

Rebecca Solomon

Rebecca Solomon’s success as a professional artist was remarkable in the mid-nineteenth century, a time when women artists were the exception rather than the rule.

Wilma Shore

In 1929, at age sixteen, Wilma Shore went to Paris to study painting. Leo Stein, Gertrude Stein’s brother, declared her a leading talent of her generation. Years later, this prediction came true, but in another artistic area: Shore became a writer.

Sarah Shor

Sarah Shor, a painter, graphic artist and theater designer, was born on March 30, 1897 in Dubno (Ukraine), the daughter of Marc Shor, a merchant of modest means.

Miriam Schapiro

Miriam (Mimi) Schapiro is one of the foremost pioneers in the feminist art movement in the United States. Nicknamed “Mimi Appleseed” after Johnny Appleseed whose dream was for a land where blossoming apple trees were everywhere, she has opened paths previously closed and unknown to women artists, past and present, trained and untrained.

Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman

Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman was born in Vienna on August 7, 1920 and settled in the Bronx, N.Y. A Yiddish poet, songwriter, educator, writer of children’s literature, graphic artist, folklorist, song stylist, Yiddish territorialist and community activist, Schaechter-Gottesman was inducted in to the Museum of the City of New York’s “City Lore Hall of Fame” in 1999, an award that honors “grass roots contributions to New York’s cultural life.”

Charlotte Salomon

Charlotte Salomon was living as a refugee from Nazism in Villefranche on the French Riviera when she made a startling discovery: that eight members of her family, one by one, over the years, had committed suicide. With this traumatic revelation in mind, she arrived at what she called “The question: whether to take her own life or to undertake something eccentric and mad.” Something “eccentric and mad” turned out to be an artwork in over seven hundred scenes, painted during one year (1941–1942), enriched by dialogues, soliloquies and musical references, arranged into acts and scenes, and titled “Life? Or Theater? An Operetta.”

Doris Rosenthal

Doris Rosenthal was a daring explorer, a dedicated educator, and a painter of colorful and expressive yet unromanticized work representing the everyday life of Mexican Indians at a time when anti-Mexican sentiment in the United States was rife.

Antonietta Raphaël

The celebrated painter and sculptor Antoinetta Raphael, whose artistic works vividly portray both the imaginary and the familiar.

Isadora Newman

Variously described in the pages of the New York Times in the 1920s and 1930s as writer, poet, and artist, Isadora Newman found creative expression in a variety of media. Two themes, however, run through this diversity: a respect for the ability of children to see freshly and a lasting impression of the black and Creole heritage of her native New Orleans.

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