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Jewish Women, Amplified

  • A River Could Be A Tree
  • I Learned it in the Archives
  • Loving Judith
  • My Mom Used To Say...
  • A River Could Be A Tree crop

    Angela Himsel On Her Book "A River Could Be A Tree"

    Angela Himsel's memoir A River Could Be A Tree, is a personal account of her conversion to Judaism and search for identity and meaning in gray areas. Exclusively for JWA, Himsel reflects on seeing her book in stores for the first time and meditates on the uncategorizable nature of books... and people.

  • Pauline Steinem Letter 1 (1910)

    I Learned it in the Archives: Women’s Rights Activism Runs in Steinem Family

    One file of suffrage correspondence held many items on letterhead from the Ohio Woman’s Suffrage Association, of which Harriet Taylor Upton was president for many years. The letterhead listed the names of all the officers, and one name in particular caught my attention.

    The woman’s name was Pauline Steinem.

  • "Judith Slaying Holofernes" by Artemisia Gentileschi, circa 1614-20 (cropped).

    Loving Judith

    Gentileschi’s rendition of Judith is a self-portrait—allowing her to wield a sword and take revenge, if only in fantasy. Judith Slaying Holofernes was the first piece of feminist art that really moved me. Even now, I get chills when I view it. I thought a lot about Judith this week, after dusting off my menorah and dutifully buying candles and gelt.

  • Ruth Zakarin and her mother crop

    My Mom Used To Say...

    It was her go-to statement whenever she was cajoling me into doing something she considered a mitzvah, especially when I wasn’t exactly jumping at the opportunity. She would look at me with that, you know, mom look, and say, “Do good things and tell people you’re Jewish.”

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Women, Amplified." (Viewed on December 12, 2018) <https://jwa.org/blog>.

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40 min
We're with you, . Can you see us rolling our eyes from NYC? 🙄 https://t.co/zxPOLvuN2m
1 hour
, soak-stain artist Helen Frankenthaler was born. As she once said, “The only rule is that there are no… https://t.co/3M1apVf0tu