Coaches and Management

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Sports in Austria 1918-1938

This article gives an overview of the participation of Jewish women in Austrian sport from the Habsburg monarchy to the present day. Drawing on selected biographies of sportswomen and functionaries, and with a regional focus on the capital city of Vienna, it explores the double relationship between female emancipation and Jewish self-assertion in an environment that had long been male-dominated and anti-Semitic.

Agnes Keleti

A promising gymnast, Agnes Keleti survived the Nazi invasion of Hungary and won the most medals of any athlete at the 1956 Summer Olympics.

Maria Gorokhovskaya

Maria Gorokhovskaya made history by winning seven medals in gymnastics at the 1952 Olympics, the greatest number of medals a woman had won in a single Olympic Game.

Yael Arad

Yael Arad celebrated an unprecedented victory in 1992 when she won the Olympic silver medal for judo, making her the first Israeli Olympic medalist for any sport.

Rusty Kanokogi

The first woman allowed to train with male judo students at Japan’s judo headquarters, the Kodokan, Rena “Rusty” Kanokogi pioneered women’s judo as an Olympic sport.

Natalie Cohen

A lifelong lover of tennis, Natalie Cohen made her mark on the sport as both an athlete and a trusted referee.

Nancy Lieberman-Cline

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Senda Berenson

Drawn to sports by her recovery from childhood illness, Senda Berenson became known as the “Mother of Women’s Basketball.”

Rena Glickman featured by Sports Illustrated

November 24, 2008

“The father of men's judo was a small, quiet, disciplined athlete who lived in Japan a century ago. No big surprise there. The mother of women's judo?

Kayla, Rusty, and the "best sport in the world"

Ellen K. Rothman

When I opened The Boston Globe on Friday morning, I was greeted by a large photo above the fold of a jubilant Kayla Harrison, who had just become the first US judo athlete to win an Olympic gold medal.

Rusty Kanokogi

Grappling all the way to the Olympics

Gabrielle Orcha

For the first time in world history, this year every country competing in the Olympics has a female athlete on its team.

Women’s basketball pioneer Nancy Lieberman becomes the first woman to coach a NBA D-League men’s basketball team

November 4, 2009

On November 4, 2009, Nancy Lieberman broke yet another barrier when she became the first woman head coach of the Dallas Mavericks’ D-League af

Senda Berenson officiates at first collegiate women's basketball game

March 22, 1893

Senda Berenson, the "Mother of Women's Basketball," officiated at the first women's basketball game on March 22, 1893, at Smith College, in Northa

Fanny "Bobbie" Rosenfeld

Fanny “Bobbie” Rosenfeld (1904-1969) is Canada’s woman athlete of the first-half (20th) century. She competed in numerous sports, set national and world records, and earned many awards and championships. She also participated in the 1928 Amsterdam Olympic Games and was a coach, sports administrator, official, and sports columnist.

Sports in Germany: 1898-1938

Women’s participation in Jewish gymnastics clubs increased significantly during the first two decades of the twentieth century. The Jewish sports movement grew during the 1920s, allowing women to participate in cross-country running, swimming, and tennis. After German sports clubs annulled Jewish membership in 1933, women poured into these Jewish sports groups.

Sport in Israel: Yishuv to the Early 21st Century

Women have been involved in sports in Israel since the Yishuv period, participating as teams, as individuals, and as coaches. Though more women are now participating in competitive sports, the field still reflects a masculine culture of power struggle and a desire to defeat the enemy. More recent political efforts in Israel have attempted to achieve women's equality in athletics.

Charlotte Epstein

Charlotte “Eppy” Epstein helped popularize women’s swimming and coached Olympic athletes who broke more than fifty world records. Epstein also started the renowned Women’s Swimming Association of New York, which launched the national and international fame of American women swimmers in the early twentieth century.

Senda Berenson

Known as the “Mother of Women’s Basketball,” Senda Berenson pioneered women’s basketball as the director of the physical education department at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. Many of the rules she developed for women’s basketball became the standard ones used for seventy years.

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