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Judith Rosenbaum

Judith Rosenbaum
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Judith Rosenbaum.
Judith Rosenbaum is a feminist educator, historian, writer, and activist—and the incoming Executive Director of the Jewish Women's Archive. A regular contributor to academic and popular publications, including Tablet Magazine, The Jewish Daily Forward, and The Huffington Post, Rosenbaum is currently co-editing an anthology about the modern Jewish mother. She's inspired by anarchist Emma Goldman, political activist Bella Abzug, writer and activist Grace Paley, and other loud Jewish women—including those in her own family.

Blog posts

Bella Abzug at a Women Strike for Peace Protest

#JWAmegaphone: Voices of Power and Protest

At JWA, we believe that history is not only about the past, but also about the present—it’s unfolding every day. Recent events have made us more keenly aware than ever that we’re living through history in the making. And not just witnessing it—we are part of it, makers of history with each action we take.

Taken together, those actions tell a story—a story about how people protest, honor, resist, and remember; about how we struggle, hope, dream, and make change.

Rachel Weisz and Deborah Lipstadt

Jewish Women's Top Ten Memorable Moments in 2016

I’ll admit it: 2016 has brought some seriously challenging moments, and I won’t be sad to turn the calendar’s page to a fresh new year. But before we move boldly ahead into 2017, let’s reflect on the standout moments—both highs and lows—for Jewish women this year. In no particular order, here are my top ten memorable moments for Jewish women in 2016 ...

Good Girls Revolt

Did Amazon Just Cancel Feminism?

The night before the election, I was too anxious to sleep, and in an effort to distract myself, I binge-watched the new Amazon series, Good Girls Revolt. Though the events it fictionalizes—when women brought a sex discrimination suit against Newsweek magazine—took place 47 years ago, it felt timely. As we stood on the cusp (I thought) of shattering the presidential glass ceiling, I reveled in watching young women in the waning days of the 1960s come into a sense of their own potential and their right to equal opportunity.

Topics: Television
National Organization of Women Meeting

Stories matter, now more than ever

Stories will heal us—individually and as a nation. So reach out to someone and share a story or engage in conversation. We offer these questions as conversation starters.

Menorah, Congregation Beth Israel, New Orleans, April 11, 2006

Katrina's Jewish Voices, Ten Years Later

When most of us think of Hurricane Katrina, the Jewish community of New Orleans is not the first thing to come to mind. We’re more likely to think of the devastation of the Ninth Ward, of the homes marked with the number of bodies found inside, of the desperate conditions in the Superdome.

Topics: History
Mad Men

Mad Men TV Club: Farewell, Mad Men

Since the return of Rachel Menken in Season 7, JWA's Judith Rosenbaum and Tara Metal have been having a blast writing about Mad Men on the blog. After Sunday's series finale (sob!) they had one last chat about Don's legacy, Peggy's love life, and Joan's feminism.

Topics: Television
Sally and Betty from AMC's Mad Men

Mad Men TV Club: Last Minute Reflections

I’m late to the party of commentary on last week’s episode, The Milk and Honey Route, and anyway, all thoughts are running to this evening’s looming end. So I offer some general reflections instead. 

Peggy Olsen from Mad Men

Feminism, finally

This week’s episode finally brought the moment I’ve been waiting for: when the women’s movement makes its arrival on the scene, if only in passing mention. I practically stood up and cheered when Joan sat, calm but radiating power, on Jim Hobart’s couch and challenged him with the mention of Betty Friedan, the EEOC, and the sit-ins at the Ladies’ Home Journal. It seemed that now, after years of struggling on her own, she had a team of women to back her up.

Don and Sally, Mad Men

Mad Men TV Club: Women of the Future

I’m sure no one will be surprised to hear that my love of Mad Men stems from its focus on the gender politics of the 1960s. (When the first episode aired, I remember watching with my husband and exclaiming, “It’s like my graduate studies come to life!”). So while I found this episode frustrating in many ways (why has Glen Bishop returned and what was that scene with Betty in the kitchen??), it was at least somewhat satisfying to see women’s growing confidence and opportunity emerge from an otherwise depressing storyline.

Megan Draper and Don Draper

Mad Men TV Club: Repetition Compulsion

I won’t lie – this was an annoying episode, and such a disappointment after last week’s strong premiere. And it’s not just that I missed Rachel Menken (which I obviously did).

Topics: Television

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. " Judith Rosenbaum ." (Viewed on January 17, 2017) <https://jwa.org/blog/author/judith-rosenbaum>.

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Standing ovation of a packed room for orthodox feminist pioneer Blu Greenberg.
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Rabbi Lila Kagedan: “Off the record support is not really support. If u support someone, do it at the top of your lungs.”