Women's Rights

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Collection

Jane Harman

Using the slogan, “This woman will clean House,” Jane Harman won the first of her nine terms as a congresswoman before becoming the first woman president and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Ida Espen Guggenheimer

Ida Espen Guggenheimer supported Zionism, civil rights, and feminism throughout her life, from hosting talks on birth control to supporting political prisoners.

Gloria Feldt

Driven by her own experiences as a teenage mother, Gloria Feldt became an advocate for women's rights and reproductive choice, leading Planned Parenthood for a decade.

Regina Jonas

Regina Jonas made history as the first woman rabbi after writing a thesis arguing for the halakhic permissibility of women’s ordination.

Ida Weis Friend

As a suffragist, a philanthropist, and a leader of Jewish women’s organizations, Ida Weis Friend worked to improve the lives of those in her community on many levels.

Jacqueline Levine

Jacqueline Levine lent her voice to a stunning array of social justice causes, from civil rights to ending hunger to women’s leadership in the Jewish community.

Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Mary Belle Grossman

Mary Belle Grossman made history in 1918 as one of the first two women admitted to the American Bar Association, then dedicated her career to protecting women.

Emma Leon Gottheil

As a translator, Emma Leon Gottheil helped spread the ideals of Zionism across America, but as founder of the Women’s League for Palestine, she helped turn those ideals into practical reality.

Käte Frankenthal

A doctor and military surgeon who smoked cigars and drank beer and whiskey, Käte Frankenthal refused to be limited to traditional women’s roles.

Luba Robin Goldsmith

A respected doctor and teacher of medicine, Luba Robin Goldsmith created a supportive environment for women who followed her into medicine.

Doris Fleischman

Despite working in her husband’s office for much of her career, Doris Fleischman was an ardent feminist who made history as the first American married woman issued a passport under her own name.

Shulamith Firestone

In The Dialectic of Sex, Shulamith Firestone argued that women’s liberation would require a radical rethinking of sexual mechanics, pregnancy, and gender roles.

Rita Sapiro Finkler

Rita Sapiro Finkler was a pioneer in the field of endocrinology, making important discoveries about the role hormones play in pregnancy, menopause, and other aspects of women’s health.

Doris Bauman Gold

Doris Bauman Gold founded Biblio Press to offer Jewish women a better sense of their history and to create a venue for authors of new feminist rituals and prayers.

Adele Ginzberg

Known as “Mama G.” and “Mrs. Seminary,” Adele Ginzberg helped her husband, Louis Ginzberg, create a warm atmosphere at the Jewish Theological Seminary and helped lay the groundwork for women’s greater inclusion in Conservative Judaism.

Susan Brandeis Gilbert

The daughter of Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Susan Brandeis Gilbert became one of the first women attorneys to argue a case before the Supreme Court.

Norma Fields Furst

Norma Fields Furst used her positions of authority at different colleges and universities to garner support for civil rights and gender equality within academia.

Carrie Bamberger Frank Fuld

Carrie Bamburger Frank Fuld joined her brother and husband in creating and supporting hospitals, schools, and most notably the Institute for Advanced Study, which welcomed Albert Einstein and others engaged in pure research.

Bobbi Fiedler

Roberta “Bobbi” Fiedler felt driven by the Holocaust to oppose government regulation of citizens’ lives, leading her to a career as a Republican congresswoman.

Mary Fels

Mary Fels used her wealth and her talents as a writer and editor to further the Zionist cause, arguing passionately for a Jewish state and helping create both settlements and industry in Israel.

Sara Rivka Feder-Keyfitz

A childhood friend of Golda Meir, Sara Feder-Keyfitz grew up to be a significant Zionist and feminist leader in her own right.

Blanche Goldman Etra

An Orthodox Jew whose family protested her attending college, Blanche Goldman Etra opened doors to independence and education for other Jewish women by founding women’s divisions of medical schools and women’s seminars on financial planning.

Andrea Dworkin

A lightning rod for controversy, Andrea Dworkin denounced violence against women, advocated women’s self-defense, and drafted groundbreaking legislation claiming that pornography violated women’s civil rights.

Naomi Deutsch

A leader in the field of public health nursing, Naomi Deutch spearheaded health and sanitation campaigns in the US, Central America, and the Caribbean.
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