Journalism

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Jean Gordon

Already a successful businesswoman who had created a popular textile company, Jean Gordon launched a remarkable second career as the owner and publisher of Dance Magazine.

Josephine Clara Goldmark

Josephine Goldmark laid the groundwork for transforming American labor laws by amassing data that forced lawmakers to confront the painful realities of factory work.

Lee Weiss Frank

After WWII, Lee Weiss Frank used her position as a reporter for the Philadelphia Ledger to speak out in favor of creating a Jewish state in Israel.

Mary Arbitman Fellman

As a historian, a journalist, a community leader, and a matchmaker, Mary Arbitman Fellman cared for the past, present, and future of the Jewish community in Omaha.

Andrea Dworkin

A lightning rod for controversy, Andrea Dworkin denounced violence against women, advocated women’s self-defense, and drafted groundbreaking legislation claiming that pornography violated women’s civil rights.

Celia Dropkin

Celia Dropkin defied both social and artistic conventions with her sensual, free-verse, Yiddish poetry.

Midge Decter

A founder of the neoconservative movement, Midge Decter delighted in challenging liberal views and acting as a thorn in the side of the feminist movement.

Carrie Dreyfuss Davidson

Carrie Dreyfuss Davidson became an important voice for women in the Conservative Movement as a founder of United Synagogue’s Women’s League and founding editor of their journal Outlook.

Annette Daum

Annette Daum combined interfaith dialogue and feminism in the hopes of both defusing anti-Semitism in the feminist movement and finding solutions to the common problems facing women in different faiths.

Rose Laub Coser

Sociologist Rose Laub Coser redefined major concepts in role theory—the idea that our actions are largely dictated by our roles in society—and applied them to expectations of women’s roles in the family and the workplace.

Lucille Corcos

Lucille Corcos was celebrated as one of the foremost “modern primitivist” painters in America, creating scenes where the outside walls of buildings fell away to reveal the lives of those within.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

Natalie Cohen

A lifelong lover of tennis, Natalie Cohen made her mark on the sport as both an athlete and a trusted referee.

Jessica Cohen

Jessie Cohen served as editor of the Jewish Review and Observer for most of her life, maintaining an important resource for Jews in the city of Cleveland.

Vera Caspary

Vera Caspary wrote novels and screenplays featuring strong, complex women who were never simply villains or victims.

Ruth Mack Brunswick

Psychoanalyst Ruth Mack Brunswick served as a crucial sounding board for Sigmund Freud, helping him revise his theories on the importance of the mother in the early shaping of the psyche.

Ruth F. Brin

Ruth F. Brin helped transform modern prayer with her evocative writing, translation, and poetry.

Rose Brenner

As president of the National Council of Jewish Women, Rose Brenner focused on inclusion of people who were often marginalized—the deaf, the blind, and those isolated in rural areas.

Claire Bodner

Despite having almost no training in either fashion or business, Claire Bodner ran a successful fashion design company that was featured in the top magazines and stores in the country.

Anita Block

As editor of the women’s page of the New York Call, one of America’s first socialist newspapers, Anita Block ensured the section covered subjects of real social and political interest to women, commenting, “It was probably the only women’s page which never printed a recipe or a fashion note.”

Chaske Blacker

In her short life, Chaske Blacker wrote two novellas and a dozen short stories while acting as the main breadwinner for her two children and her poet husband.

Ilse Bing

Ilse Bing’s experiments with the new Leica camera and darkroom techniques like polarization and cropping helped break down the boundaries between artistic photography, photojournalism, and commercial work.

Anne Fleischman Bernays

Through her novels, Anne Bernays explored the Jewish experience of America, the pressures of assimilation, and the then-taboo subject of sexual harassment.

Margarete Berent

Margarete Berent fought for acceptance as the first female lawyer to practice in Prussia and began her career again from scratch after fleeing Nazi persecution.

Evelyn Torton Beck

Evelyn Torton Beck made contributions to women’s studies and the Jewish community through her scholarship and her efforts to ensure lesbian inclusion in Jewish life.
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