Journalism

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Marion Eugénie Bauer

A modernist composer who experimented with dissonance, serialism, and complex harmonies, Marion Eugénie Bauer also made strides for women through her musical scholarship that revived interest in female composers.

Dorothy Walter Baruch

Psychologist Dorothy Walter Baruch championed a psychodynamic approach to child development that focused on the relationship between physical, emotional, and intellectual development and on rechanneling children’s feelings through play and art therapy.

Florence Bamberger

Florence Bamberger’s belief in training educators by pairing them with mentors who supervised them in the classroom continues to influence the ways in which teachers are trained.

Bertha Badt-Strauss

Bertha Badt-Strauss used her writing to create a broader range of possible identities for women in the cultural Zionist movement called the Jewish Renaissance.

Sophie Cahn Axman

Sophie Cahn Axman became known as “the angel of the Tombs” for her work as a probation officer helping troubled children.

Eve Arnold

The first American woman accepted into the groundbreaking cooperative Magnum Photos, Eve Arnold was hailed for both her photojournalism and her more artistic work.

Sue Alexander

Sue Alexander wove her life into the children’s books she wrote and helped create a support network for other creators as a founding board member of the international Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert carved a niche for herself in the fashion world as the head of a modeling agency and an inventor of new kinds of fashion shows.

Anzia Yezierska

Anzia Yezierska turned the frustrations and indignities she suffered in New York’s tenements into novels and short stories that depicted the lives of Jewish immigrants.

Ruth R. Wisse

Ruth R. Wisse made major contributions to Yiddish literature as both a scholar and an editor.

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin made great advances for women’s involvement in Jewish life through the schools she created and her editorship of the Jewish Spectator.

Wendy Wasserstein

In 1989, Wendy Wasserstein not only won the Pulitzer Prize for The Heidi Chronicles, she became the first woman playwright to win a Tony Award.

Barbara Walters

Barbara Walters became a household name in television journalism for her adept, exclusive interviews with some of the most noted people on the world stage, from Katherine Hepburn and Princess Grace of Monaco to Fidel Castro and Vladimir Putin.

Abigail Van Buren

Born Pauline Friedman, Abigail Van Buren was best known for her “Dear Abby” column and the witty, commonsense advice she gave hundreds of millions of readers.

Barbara W. Tuchman

Barbara W. Tuchman won two Pulitzer Prizes for her popular histories The Guns of August and Stilwell and the American Experience in China.

Rose Pastor Stokes

Called the “Cinderella of the sweatshops,” Rose Pastor Stokes made headlines when she married millionaire socialist James Graham Phelps Stokes.

Susan Sontag

Through her work as a literary and cultural critic, Susan Sontag called long-held assumptions and taboos into question.

Rosa Sonneschein

Rosa Sonneschein created the American Jewess, the first English-language magazine for Jewish women in the United States.

Birth of Cancer Patient Advocate Rose Kushner

June 22, 1929

"We women should be free, knowledgeable, and completely conscious when the time comes for a decision, so that we can make it for ourselves." Cancer patient advocate Rose Kushner

Dorothy Miller Zellner

As co-editor of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s newsletter, the Student Voice, Dorothy Miller Zellner helped craft the organization’s message and report on stories suppressed by the mainstream media.

Harriet Tanzman

Harriet Tanzman has become a chronicler of the civil rights movement, creating new entry points into civil rights history.

Roberta Galler

Roberta Galler’s work for the Congressional Challenge marked a landmark civil rights effort, using six hundred depositions that blacks had been prevented from voting in the 1964 congressional election as evidence that the election was unconstitutional.

Frances Slanger

One of four nurses to wade ashore at Normandy Beach on D-Day, Frances Slanger was the only nurse to die as a result of enemy action in the European Theater.

Joanna Eckstein

Joanna Eckstein widened the perspective of Seattle residents both with her travel writing and as a patron of the arts who supported individual artists and museums.

Aline Saarinen

Aline Saarinen’s combination of creativity and plain speaking made her an unusually engaging art critic and prompted the National Broadcasting Company to make her chief of their Paris news bureau, the first woman to hold such a position.
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