Journalism

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Esther Jane Ruskay

At a time when the Jewish community was focused on the benefits of assimilation and the possibilities of ethical culture, Esther Jane Ruskay argued passionately for a return to traditional religious practice and study.

Muriel Rukeyser

Muriel Rukeyer’s poetry reflected her passionate activism and her belief in confronting the truth of her lived experience.

Anne Roiphe

A prolific journalist, essayist and novelist, Anne Roiphe is known for tackling issues of feminism and Jewish identity in her writing.

Adrienne Rich

Adrienne Cecile Rich used her poetry as a means to reclaim the voices of the silenced, drawing from her own experience as a woman and lesbian.

Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand sparked a new ethical philosophy called Objectivism with the principles laid out in her novels including the Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

Sylvia Field Porter

Sylvia Field Porter, known for her clear, straightforward writing and wise advice, broke ground as the first woman to write the financial section of a big-city newspaper.

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker commented on the art and events of her times with her brilliant turns of phrase and acid wit.

Pauline Newman

Pauline Newman made massive strides for workers’ rights, especially women workers, by building bridges between many different factions.

Belle Moskowitz

Belle Moskowitz gained considerable power and influence as New York Governor Alfred E. Smith’s closest advisor by offering him her complete loyalty and support through his gubernatorial work and his 1928 presidential campaign.

Adah Isaacs Menken

In her short but remarkable life, actress Adah Isaacs Menken became legendary for her scandalous defiance of convention.

Amy Loveman

Amy Loveman’s passion for literature made her the ideal book review editor and led to her vital role in the Book-of-the-Month Club, selecting great books to introduce to new readers.

Linda Lingle

Linda Lingle became the second Jewish woman to be elected a US governor when she became governor of Hawai’i in 2002.

Tehilla Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein cofounded Jewish Science with her husband as an alternative to Christian Science, creating a small but passionate following and carving a place for herself as a congregational leader.

Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz’s rapport with her subjects and her genius for posing them in surprising ways has led to some of the most iconic pictures of the twentieth century and has shaped our vision of celebrities.

Ann Landers

Ann Landers counseled millions of readers through her popular advice column for over forty years on issues from the growing pains of adolescence to the grief of widowhood with wit, humor, kindness, and good sense.
New York Times Masthead

Weekend Roundup: Jill Abramson is out at the Times

by Tara Metal

In the few short days since Jill Abramson’s surprise firing from her post as executive editor of the New York Times, much has been written about her ouster.

Florence Prag Kahn

Florence Prag Kahn made history as the first Jewish woman to serve in Congress, first filling her husband’s seat and then in her own right, with Alice Roosevelt Longworth commenting that she was “the equal of any man in Congress, and the superior of most.”

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman fought to ensure that women’s tennis was taken seriously and that women players competed for the same prize money as men.

Ruth Gruber

Ruth Gruber didn’t just record history, she made history as the youngest-ever PhD, an honorary general, and the reporter who covered the famed voyage of the Exodus 1947.

Fanny Goldstein

Fanny Goldstein’s belief in the importance of ethnic and immigrant pride led to her creation of National Jewish Book Week.

Edna Ferber

In her novels, short stories, and plays, Edna Ferber captured the rich variety of life in America, from the Mississippi River in Show Boat to the wilds of Alaska in Ice Palace.

Nora Ephron

Nora Ephron mined her most painful experiences to create brilliant comedies like Heartburn and When Harry Met Sally.

Selma Jeanne Cohen

Selma Jeanne Cohen transformed the field of dance by giving critics and historians the language to discuss the nuances of performance and choreography.

Nina Morais Cohen

Nina Morais Cohen organized the Jewish women’s community of Minneapolis as a force for women’s suffrage, community service, and scholarship.

Ruth Hagy Brod

Ruth Hagy Brod’s varied career as a journalist, documentary filmmaker and literary agent made her the ideal publicity director for Job Orientation In the Neighborhoods, helping high school dropouts train for careers.
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