Journalism

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Sara Landau

Highly unusual for her time, Sara Landau not only made a name for herself as a respected economist, but paired her scholarship with inexhaustible volunteerism both in her community and through national organizations.

Sarah Kussy

With seemingly limitless energy, Sarah Kussy helped found and lead a variety of major Jewish organizations like Hadassah, the United Synagogue’s Women’s League, and Young Judea.

Miriam Kressyn

Miriam Kressyn was that rare talent known as much for her performances as for her work offstage as a historian of the Yiddish theater.

Isa Kremer

A former star of the Russian Imperial Opera, Isa Kremer insisted on singing Yiddish songs to instill pride in Jewish audiences despite rampant anti-Semitism.

Gerda Weissmann Klein

Gerda Weissmann Klein used her experiences in the Holocaust to write children’s books that helped children grapple with difficult subjects.

Lena Kenin

Lena Nemerovsky Kenin made major contributions to both gynecology and psychology with her successful medical practice and her groundbreaking work on postpartum depression.

Sue Kaufman

Sue Kaufman’s 1967 breakout novel, Diary of a Mad Housewife, earned her a reputation for writing subtly brutal novels about the isolation and frustration of city life.

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

Beatrice Kaufman

A member of the famed Algonquin Round Table, Beatrice Kaufman made an impact on the American literary scene both for publishing important modernist writers and for writing her own subversively feminist stories and plays.

Miriam Karpilove

Miriam Karpilove’s wildly popular Yiddish stories explored the tensions and frustrations Jewish women faced at the turn of the century—the desire for secular education, the hunger to participate in a wider culture, and the hardships of immigration.

Rose Kaplan

Despite her own failing health, Rose Kaplan insisted on nursing Jewish settlers in Palestine and refugees in Egypt and inspired others to follow her example.

Geri M. Joseph

Geri M. Joseph distinguished herself both as a journalist covering vital stories and as US ambassador to the Netherlands during a diplomatic crisis.

Lydia Joel

Lydia Joel began her dance career as a performer, but it was as the editor of Dance Magazine that she had the greatest impact on the field.

Jean Jaffe

Jean Jaffe’s career was doubly remarkable: she was a field reporter at a time when women were usually relegated to the society pages and a Yiddish-language journalist at a time when most American reporters wrote in English.

Lotte Jacobi

A fourth-generation photographer, Lotte Jacobi became known for capturing her subjects, no matter how famous or iconic, in honest, unguarded moments.

Edith Somborn Isaacs

Edith Somborn Isaacs made an impact on New York City both through her own volunteerism and by successfully running her husband’s campaigns for public office.

Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman

In her poems, essays, and short stories, Rebekah Gumpert Hyneman urged her fellow Jews to resist assimilation and understand the power and beauty of their tradition.

Libbie Henrietta Hyman

Libbie Henrietta Hyman spent her career researching and writing the definitive texts on invertebrates, a monumental effort.

Fannie Hurst

One of the highest-paid American writers of her time, Fannie Hurst explored the challenges facing Jews and other minorities.

Beth Bowman Hess

Beth Bowman Hess brought a humanist and feminist sensibility to gerontology by discussing the difficulties the elderly faced not as problems inherent in older people, but as problems in the social order that should be confronted and changed.

Theresa Helburn

Called the “'Top Man' on Broadway” by the New York Woman, Theresa Helburn created a venue for great American playwrights as director of the Theatre Guild and played a key role in the history of the modern American musical.

Leah Cohen Harby

A member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Leah ““Lee” Cohen Harby’s patriotism and her pride in her Southern roots found an outlet in her essays, short stories, and poetry.

Sarah Hamer-Jacklyn

Sarah Hamer-Jacklyn’s popular Yiddish tales not only painted a vivid portrait of the lost shtetl of her youth, but also added a dimension male authors of the time had missed: a nuanced and complex picture of the lives of Jewish women.

Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg

As director of the Child Study Association of America, Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg blended the best research on child development and her own experience as a mother of four to offer advice to parents.

Vivian Gornick

Vivian Gornick chronicled her own feminist awakening and that of the country through both her journalism for the Village Voice and her powerful memoirs.
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