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Music

NY Times hails Carnegie Hall performance by Rosina and Josef Lhévinne

January 14, 1939

Master teacher and pianist Rosina Lhévinne performed in a two-piano recital with her husband, to mark the 40th anniversary of both their marriage and their professional collaboration.

Debbie Friedman plays Carnegie Hall

January 7, 1996

Debbie Friedman gave a sold out concert at Carnegie Hall, marking twenty-five years as one of the Jewish community's most well-known and influential contemporary musicians.

Yemenite Women in Israel: 1948 to the Present Day

Approximately fifty thousand Jews came to Israel from Yemen via Operation Magic Carpet during the period of mass immigration (1949–1950) (Barer 1956; Sa’adon 2002: 115–125). A further 3,500 arrived between 1988–1996 (Saadon 2002, 122). The transition of Yemenite women from a traditional-religious society to a western-secular society is marked by a certain ambivalence.

Rosalyn Tureck

Pianist Rosalyn Tureck has toured the world as a consummate interpreter of the keyboard music of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Nacha Rivkin

Orthodox Jewish education for women in America began with the work of Nacha Rivkin, a founder of Shulamith School for Girls, the first girls’ yeshiva in the United States.

Betty Robbins

Amid great worldwide controversy, the first female cantor in Jewish history, Betty Robbins, was appointed in July 1955. Never before had a woman worn the garb and performed the traditional role of hazzan (cantor) in a Jewish synagogue anywhere in the world.

Nadia Reisenberg

Whether recording a Brahms sonata with clarinetist Benny Goodman, enjoying her three grandsons, or giving a master class in Jerusalem, pianist Nadia Reisenberg’s joy in relationships radiated from her.

Dame Myra Hess

One of the most potent symbols representing the spirit of war-torn Britain during World War II must be the series of concerts at London’s National Gallery which continued throughout the war. Within a month of hostilities being declared, the National Gallery was closed and its paintings safely stored outside the capital. Cinemas, theaters and concert halls were all dark; Myra Hess, by then an established concert pianist, was concerned about the effect of this cultural blackout on the lives of Londoners. Towards the end of September 1939, she approached the Director of the Gallery, Kenneth Clark, with the idea of mounting lunchtime classical concerts. Clark shared her concerns and swiftly obtained government approval for the scheme. On Tuesday, October 10, the first lunchtime concert was staged; a resounding success, it was the first of an uninterrupted succession that continued for six and a half years until April 10, 1946, 1,698 concerts later.

Edith Weiss-Mann

One of the most important of the pioneers in the revival of early music and period musical instruments in the early years of the twentieth and, sadly, one of those pioneers who is least remembered by posterity, the harpsichordist Edith Weiss-Mann was born in Hamburg, Germany, on May 11, 1885.

Michal Smoira-Cohn

One of Israel’s best-known musicologists, Smoira-Cohn’s expertise has led to her involvement in innumerable musical features and events and continues to be a leading figure in Israel’s cultural life.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Music." (Viewed on January 18, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/music>.

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