Athletes

Content type
Collection

Adele Lewisohn Lehman

Adele Lewisohn Lehman’s career as a philanthropist and organizational leader spanned both the Jewish community and the secular world.

Bobbie Rosenfeld / Aly Raisman

Olympians

Going for the Gold 

Julie Heldman

Julie Heldman won 22 professional tennis titles in her stunning career.

Deena Kastor

Long distance runner Deena Kastor was an eight–time national champion in cross country and holds the American records in the marathon, half–marathon, 5K, 8K, and 15K races.

Dara Torres

An athlete of remarkable endurance and drive, twelve-time Olympic medalist Dara Torres is the only American swimmer to have competed in five Olympics.

Rusty Kanokogi

The first woman allowed to train with male judo students at Japan’s judo headquarters, the Kodokan, Rena “Rusty” Kanokogi pioneered women’s judo as an Olympic sport.

Sarah Hughes

In a thrilling, surprise victory, Sarah Hughes won the gold medal for figure skating at the 2002 Olympics, becoming the first American to win that honor without ever having won a World or US senior national title.

Aly Raisman

Alexandra “Aly” Raisman not only won gold and bronze medals for her individual performances at the 2012 Olympics but captained the women’s gymnastic team that won the gold medal that year.
Baltimore Ravens Helmet

It Ain’t Easy Being A Feminist Sports Fan

by  Emilia Diamant

Sure, we’ve got Mo’ne Davis and Serena Williams, Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Hope Solo, but it’s still a man’s world.

Topics: Feminism, Athletes

Thelma Eisen

Thelma “Tiby” Eisen made history as one of the first female professional baseball players, and then made history more literally as a creator of an exhibit honoring her fellow players at the Baseball Hall of Fame, to ensure their triumphs were not forgotten.

Natalie Cohen

A lifelong lover of tennis, Natalie Cohen made her mark on the sport as both an athlete and a trusted referee.

Gretel Bergmann

High jumper Gretel Bergmann’s Olympic hopes were dashed when Nazi officials both refused to let her leave Germany and refused to let her compete in the 1936 Games.

Amy Alcott

Amy Alcott dedicated her life to the game of golf and spent years chasing one last, elusive win before finally making it into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Nancy Lieberman

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman fought to ensure that women’s tennis was taken seriously and that women players competed for the same prize money as men.

Lillian Copeland

Lillian Copeland was the epitome of a strong woman with a remarkable career, first as a record-setting Olympic medalist and later as an officer in the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

Senda Berenson

Drawn to sports by her recovery from childhood illness, Senda Berenson became known as the “Mother of Women’s Basketball.”

Bobbie Rosenfeld

Bobbie Rosenfeld wasn’t just an Olympic medalist, she was quite possibly the most versatile athlete of all time.

Anya Davidovich and Evgeny Krasnopolski

Landing the Triple: Female, Israeli, and First

by Paula Sinclair

Anya Davidovich, a sixteen-year old girl born in the USA, will be skating for Israel in the Winter Olympics. Her parents are Israeli, and most of her family lives in Israel. She is part of the first-ever pairs team to compete for Israel in the Olympics and the only female member of Team Israel. Anya will be carrying the flag for the Israeli delegation.

Paula Sinclair, JWA Director of Programs & Partnerships, interviewed Anya and her mother as they prepared for their trip to Sochi.

Topics: Athletes, Olympics

Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 1907 - 2013

In 1998, at the age of 91, she took up kayaking, making regular excursions on the Hudson River and along the coast and on the lakes of Maine. As a result of these experiences, she became a significant supporter of environmental organizations.

Rena Glickman featured by Sports Illustrated

November 24, 2008

“The father of men's judo was a small, quiet, disciplined athlete who lived in Japan a century ago. No big surprise there. The mother of women's judo?

Row Boat

Taking Things Into Her Own Hands: Disabled Israeli Athlete Belts Out Hatikvah

by  Deborah Fineblum Raub

In 1878, Naphtali Herz Imber, an English poet originally from current-day Ukraine, paid tribute to the dream of a Jewish homeland.

Topics: Sports, Athletes

Kayla, Rusty, and the "best sport in the world"

by  Ellen K. Rothman

When I opened The Boston Globe on Friday morning, I was greeted by a large photo above the fold of a jubilant Kayla Harrison, who had just become the first US judo athlete to win an Olympic gold medal.

Olympic Rings Formation

Dear Aly: I could nevah hava (nagila) 'nuff of you!

by  Gabrielle Orcha

Dear Aly,

Though you’re ten years my junior, you inspire me. At five feet two inches, you are strong—in body and spirit; you are open and kind; you are level-headed and take things as they come.

Topics: Music, Athletes, Olympics
Rusty Kanokogi

Grappling all the way to the Olympics

by  Gabrielle Orcha

For the first time in world history, this year every country competing in the Olympics has a female athlete on its team.

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