Athletes

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Top 10 Moments for Jewish Women in 2011

by Jewesses With Attitude
10. We celebrated the 40th anniversary of Our Bodies, Ourselves

Orthodox basketball star Naama Shafir leads the University of Toledo to victory

April 2, 2011

On Saturday, April 2, 2011, junior guard Naama Shafir scored a career-high 40 points, securing the University of Toledo’s victory over the University of Southern California in the final round of

Stanford wins NCAA College Cup with help from Jewish soccer star, Camille Levin

December 4, 2011

After four straight trips to the women’s soccer Final Four, Stanford finally brought home the NCAA College Cup with the help of senior Camille Levin, a Jewish woman from Newport Coast, CA in a Dece

Cheerleading

Does cheerleading matter to Jewish women?

by  Leah Berkenwald

The National Collegiate Athletic Association is considering a proposal to recognize competitive cheerleading as an emerging sport, a step towards legitimacy as a championship sport. Anyone who has seen competitive cheerleading (and the injuries cheerleaders often sustain) can understand why; it’s a physically demanding and dangerous version of gymnastics where people perform flips and handstands not on a balance beam, but on top of a human pyramid.

Rusty Kanokogi, 1935 - 2009

Why judo? She fell in love with judo, not for the self-defense it afforded, but because it calmed her down. She already knew how to defend herself. She decided to channel her immense reserve of energy into this sport that instilled self-control.

Laura Spector's Olympic debut

by  Leah Berkenwald

Two years ago we cheered on swimmer Dara Torres, fencer Sada Jacobson, marathoner Deena Kastor, and pole Vaulter Jillian Schwartz at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. This year, only one Jewish American woman is competing in the Vancouver Olympic games, and in one of the more interesting events. Laura Spector made her Olympic debut in Vancouver, competing in the women's biathlon, a combination of cross-country skiing and rifle shooting. 

Topics: Athletes, Olympics

The decade's best Jewish athlete?

by  Leah Berkenwald

Last week the Jewish Chronicle asked us to nominate the most important Jewish person in sports over the last decade.  They suggested Israeli footballer Yossi Benayoun, European judo champion Arik Ze’evi, tennis star Andy Ram, and American swimmer Jason Lezak.  Tablet magazine picked up on the story, and added Red Sox first baseman Kevin Youkilis to the list. Excuse me, but where are the Jewish women athletes? Have they been invisible for the past ten years?  Considering the Associated Press' recent nomination of two horses for "Female Athlete of the Year," maybe so.

Topics: Athletes

Women’s basketball pioneer Nancy Lieberman becomes the first woman to coach a NBA D-League men’s basketball team

November 4, 2009

On November 4, 2009, Nancy Lieberman broke yet another barrier when she became the first woman head coach of the Dallas Mavericks’ D-League af

Bobbie Rosenfeld

During the workday, Canadian Olympic medalist Fanny "Bobbie" Rosenfeld was a stenographer in a Toronto chocolate factory. It was only on evenings and weekends that she had time to resume her role as the "world's best girl athlete." On any given day she could be seen winning softball games before crowds of thousands, breaking national and international track records or leading an ice hockey or basketball team to a league championship.

Swimmer Dara Torres qualifies for fourth Olympics

August 10, 2000

At the U.S. Olympic swimming trials in Indianapolis, Indiana, on August 10, 2000, Dara Torres swam the 100-meter butterfly in a time of 57.86.

Bobbie Rosenfeld goes for the gold

July 31, 1928

Even before she won gold and silver medals in the 1928 Olympics, Bobbie Rosenfeld was well known as a star of Canadian track and field.

Lillian Copeland wins Olympic gold

August 2, 1932

On August 2, 1932, Lillian Copeland set new world and Olympic records in discus, with a throw of 133 feet, 1 5/8 inches, winning a gold medal.

Gladys Heldman launches "World Tennis Magazine"

May 13, 1953
Tennis player, promoter, and women's advocate Gladys Heldman published the inaugural issue of "World Tennis Magazine." a forum calling for equal status and opportunity for women athletes.

Sports in the United States

The ways in which females participated in sporting life within both the immigrant and the wider culture reveal how women’s sports activities at times promoted assimilation yet also generated discord within the generational, gender, class and ethnic context of their lives in the United States.

Fanny "Bobbie" Rosenfeld

Fanny “Bobbie” Rosenfeld was named Canada’s woman athlete of the first half- century in 1950. She was a consummate all-round athlete, coach, sports administrator, official, and journalist.

Olympic Medal Winners

A table of Jewish Women who have won Olympic medals.

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman, born in New York City on May 13, 1922, to scholarly Jewish parents, was an unlikely person to become a leader in women’s tennis. Yet women tennis players today owe their equal status in the sport to her important efforts.

Eva Szekely

Olympic medalist Eva Szekely was born on April 3, 1927, in Budapest, Hungary. Between 1946 and 1954 Eva Szekely won thirty-two national individual swimming titles and eleven national team titles. In 1954 she gave birth to a daughter, Andrea (Gyarmati), who also became an Olympic medalist swimmer.

Sports in Germany: 1898-1938

From the 1890s, despite fierce resistance, German women increasingly participated in gymnastics, games and other sporting activities.

Sport: Yishuv to the Present

While it was no easy task for women to integrate successfully into the world of modern competitive sports, there is currently a marked increase in the number of competitive women athletes throughout the world. A similar development, though slower and with more modest achievements, has also occurred in Jewish sports.

Anna Sipos

Born in Hungary in 1908, Anna Sipos is remembered for her accomplishments as an outstanding table tennis player, ranked the second best women’s player of her time. Altogether, Sipos won twenty-one medals—eleven gold, six silver and four bronze—in World Championship table tennis competition.

Media, Israeli: Portrayal of Women

The integrated examination of the content of the Israeli print and electronic media engaged either in documenting reality (e.g. newspapers, news programs, current-events programs, talk shows, social programs) or in entertainment (e.g. quiz shows, soap operas, children’s programs) demonstrates the perception of the marginality of women in Israeli society. While men are presented as the “normal,” women, who constitute the majority of society, are presented as the minority “other”—the exception, the incomplete, the impaired, the marginal.

Nancy Lieberman-Cline

Born in Brooklyn, New York on July 1, 1958, Nancy Lieberman soon moved with her parents, Jerome and Renée, and an older brother, Clifford, to Far Rockaway in the borough of Queens. The parents divorced shortly thereafter, and the mother raised both siblings. Despite her mother’s protests Nancy persisted in playing sports with boys, and took a special interest in basketball. She played daily on the city playgrounds, honing her skills and displaying an aggressive style of play.

Lily Kronberger

Ice-skating champion Lily Kronberger was born in 1887 in Budapest, Hungary, where the participation of Jews in ice-skating was more the result of emulating the Hungarian nobility than of any other factor.

Traute Kleinova

Traute Kleinova was born in Brno, Czechoslovakia on August 13, 1918. From early childhood she had to help her widowed mother make a living by delivering milk in her neighborhood. The boys of her class used to accompany her on her chores so that she could finish her rounds earlier in order to be able to participate in the activities of the local Jewish athletic club. She could outrun most of the boys and she beat all of them in table tennis.

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