Schools

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Edith Rosewald Stern

Edith Rosenwald Stern didn’t just commit herself to civil rights causes, she encouraged others to contribute by creating challenge grants to match donations.

Margarethe Meyer Schurz

Margarethe Meyer Schurz used the training she gained in Germany to create the first kindergarten in the United States.

Colette Roberts

Colette Roberts helped shape our understanding of modern art both through her art criticism and through her unconventional teaching methods, bringing students into artists’ studios to talk with them about their work.
Students at the Library circa 1910s

The Seditious Student: Small Steps to Rebellion

by Ilana Goldberg

I do not break rules. I color inside the lines, a textbook example of a goody two-­shoes. This is mainly because I am afraid of what will happen if I am caught breaking the rules. More specifically, I am afraid of the question of “why.” I like to have reasons for everything that I do, and so a question like, “Why did you hop that fence?” or “Why did you eat ice cream for breakfast?” leave me feeling like a complete deer in the headlights. 

Topics: Schools

Jane Prince

As president of the Women’s League for Palestine (later called the Women’s League for Israel), Jane Prince helped provide housing and education for young refugee women.

Ellen Phillips

Ellen Phillips helped shape generations of Jewish children as a founder of the Hebrew Sunday School Society, the first to offer lessons on Jewish religion and culture in English to both boys and girls.

Judith Peixotto

A gifted teacher who tirelessly promoted her students both within their schools and in the larger world, Judith Peixotto was appointed the first Jewish principal in the city of New York in 1849, at age 24.

Henrietta Szold sends nurses Rose Kaplan and Rachel Landy to Palestine to begin the work of Hadassah.

January 18, 1913
"This is what your group ought to do … You should do practical work in Palestine."

Margaret Naumburg

By creating her own school and her own system of education based on principles of psychoanalysis, Margaret Naumburg laid the groundwork for the new discipline of art therapy.

Penina Moïse

Penina Moïse shaped Jewish culture through her poetry as the first woman poet included in an American prayer book.

Pearl Bernstein Max

Pearl Bernstein Max directed the staggering work of fusing four different colleges—City, Hunter, Brooklyn, and Queens—into the City University of New York.

Judith Berlin Lieberman

As dean of the Shulamith School for Girls, Judith Berlin Lieberman emphasized the importance of Jewish girls getting the same rigorous education in Judaic studies as boys did.

Adele Rosenwald Levy

Philanthropist Adele Rosenwald Levy demonstrated her leadership skills and her passion for the Jewish community when she helped inspire American Jews to donate even more to aid Holocaust survivors than they had given to support the war effort.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Edith Altschul Lehman

Both with her husband and in her own right, Edith Altschul Lehman funded endeavors from building schools in Israel to creating a children’s zoo in Central Park.

Rachel Mordecai Lazarus

Proud of her Jewish heritage but conflicted about her faith, Rachel Mordecai Lazarus was torn between publicly fighting anti-Semitism and privately questioning Judaism’s ideals.

Janie Jacobson

Janie Jacobson’s love of Jewish tradition led her to create biblical children’s plays that were performed nationwide.

Frances Horwich

Frances Horwich was loved by parents and children alike for her educational television show, Ding Dong School.

Bertha Beitman Herzog

Bertha Beitman Herzog’s leadership of women’s organizations in Cleveland created a safety net for women and children throughout the region.

Esther Herrman

Esther Mendels Herrman’s generosity helped create many vital Jewish and secular institutions, from Barnard College to the 92nd Street Y.

Lina Frank Hecht

Lina Frank Hecht reorganized a major charitable organization of her day and found creative ways to help poor immigrants help themselves, from technical schools to her unusual Hebrew Ladies Sewing Circle.

Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim founded the Brightside Day Nursery and made it her life’s work, overseeing children’s services from day care for newborns to vocational training for teenagers.

Katya Delakova

Katya Delakova was a pioneer of Jewish dance, blending folk traditions, Hasidic worship, modern dance, and improvisation.

Ray Karchmer Daily

Ophthalmologist Ray Karchmer Daily fought to eliminate the subtle barriers that kept others from succeeding, arguing for dormitories for female medical students and free school lunches for needy children.
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