Schools

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Adele Rosenwald Levy

Philanthropist Adele Rosenwald Levy demonstrated her leadership skills and her passion for the Jewish community when she helped inspire American Jews to donate even more to aid Holocaust survivors than they had given to support the war effort.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Edith Altschul Lehman

Both with her husband and in her own right, Edith Altschul Lehman funded endeavors from building schools in Israel to creating a children’s zoo in Central Park.

Rachel Mordecai Lazarus

Proud of her Jewish heritage but conflicted about her faith, Rachel Mordecai Lazarus was torn between publicly fighting anti-Semitism and privately questioning Judaism’s ideals.

Janie Jacobson

Janie Jacobson’s love of Jewish tradition led her to create biblical children’s plays that were performed nationwide.

Frances Horwich

Frances Horwich was loved by parents and children alike for her educational television show, Ding Dong School.

Bertha Beitman Herzog

Bertha Beitman Herzog’s leadership of women’s organizations in Cleveland created a safety net for women and children throughout the region.

Esther Herrman

Esther Mendels Herrman’s generosity helped create many vital Jewish and secular institutions, from Barnard College to the 92nd Street Y.

Lina Frank Hecht

Lina Frank Hecht reorganized a major charitable organization of her day and found creative ways to help poor immigrants help themselves, from technical schools to her unusual Hebrew Ladies Sewing Circle.

Elinor Guggenheimer

Elinor Guggenheimer focused her career in city government on higher standards for childcare and on greater representation of women in politics.

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim

Irene Rothschild Guggenheim founded the Brightside Day Nursery and made it her life’s work, overseeing children’s services from day care for newborns to vocational training for teenagers.

Katya Delakova

Katya Delakova was a pioneer of Jewish dance, blending folk traditions, Hasidic worship, modern dance, and improvisation.

Ray Karchmer Daily

Ophthalmologist Ray Karchmer Daily fought to eliminate the subtle barriers that kept others from succeeding, arguing for dormitories for female medical students and free school lunches for needy children.

Fannia M. Cohn

Fannia M. Cohn led one of the largest trade unions in the US, but clashed with male leadership for years over her belief in the importance of creating independent institutions to educate workers.

Audrey Cohen

Audrey Cohen founded both a college and an organization to create paraprofessional jobs based on her belief that learning is a lifelong activity and that students learn best when they can apply their knowledge in the world.

Adele Bildersee

Adele Bildersee distinguished herself as a founding dean of Brooklyn College both for her skills as an educator and for her concern with supporting the social and emotional lives of students on campus through clubs, dances, and counseling services.

Libbie Suchoff Berkson

Libbie Suchoff Berkson was loved by generations of campers as Aunt Libbie, director of Camp Modin for girls.

Dorothy Walter Baruch

Psychologist Dorothy Walter Baruch championed a psychodynamic approach to child development that focused on the relationship between physical, emotional, and intellectual development and on rechanneling children’s feelings through play and art therapy.

Golde Bamber

Responding to a massive influx of Eastern European immigrants, Golde Bamber created schools and settlement house programs to teach the new arrivals the skills they needed to assimilate and succeed in America.

Sophie Cahn Axman

Sophie Cahn Axman became known as “the angel of the Tombs” for her work as a probation officer helping troubled children.

Rose Haas Alschuler

Rose Haas Alschuler founded and directed more than twenty nursery schools and early childhood education programs before turning her attention to Zionist causes and becoming a vital fundraiser for the State of Israel.

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert carved a niche for herself in the fashion world as the head of a modeling agency and an inventor of new kinds of fashion shows.

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin made great advances for women’s involvement in Jewish life through the schools she created and her editorship of the Jewish Spectator.

Flora Langerman Spiegelberg

Flora Langerman Spiegelberg transformed two cities in very different ways, championing education and children’s parks in Santa Fe and public sanitation in New York.

Death of education advocate and art collector Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

June 14, 1954

“The schools will only be as good as we citizens desire them to be." Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

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