Schools

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Collection

Fannia M. Cohn

Fannia M. Cohn led one of the largest trade unions in the US, but clashed with male leadership for years over her belief in the importance of creating independent institutions to educate workers.

Audrey Cohen

Audrey Cohen founded both a college and an organization to create paraprofessional jobs based on her belief that learning is a lifelong activity and that students learn best when they can apply their knowledge in the world.

Adele Bildersee

Adele Bildersee distinguished herself as a founding dean of Brooklyn College both for her skills as an educator and for her concern with supporting the social and emotional lives of students on campus through clubs, dances, and counseling services.

Libbie Suchoff Berkson

Libbie Suchoff Berkson was loved by generations of campers as Aunt Libbie, director of Camp Modin for girls.

Dorothy Walter Baruch

Psychologist Dorothy Walter Baruch championed a psychodynamic approach to child development that focused on the relationship between physical, emotional, and intellectual development and on rechanneling children’s feelings through play and art therapy.

Golde Bamber

Responding to a massive influx of Eastern European immigrants, Golde Bamber created schools and settlement house programs to teach the new arrivals the skills they needed to assimilate and succeed in America.

Sophie Cahn Axman

Sophie Cahn Axman became known as “the angel of the Tombs” for her work as a probation officer helping troubled children.

Rose Haas Alschuler

Rose Haas Alschuler founded and directed more than twenty nursery schools and early childhood education programs before turning her attention to Zionist causes and becoming a vital fundraiser for the State of Israel.

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert

Mildred Elizabeth Levine Albert carved a niche for herself in the fashion world as the head of a modeling agency and an inventor of new kinds of fashion shows.

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin

Trude Weiss-Rosmarin made great advances for women’s involvement in Jewish life through the schools she created and her editorship of the Jewish Spectator.

Flora Langerman Spiegelberg

Flora Langerman Spiegelberg transformed two cities in very different ways, championing education and children’s parks in Santa Fe and public sanitation in New York.

Death of education advocate and art collector Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

June 14, 1954

“The schools will only be as good as we citizens desire them to be." Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

Carol Ruth Silver

Carol Ruth Silver was one of the first two white women to be jailed in the Freedom Rides, an experience that sparked a career in law and politics, fighting for the rights of others.

Mathilde Schechter

Mathilde Roth Schechter was both an essential support for her husband’s work as president of the Jewish Theological Seminary and a force in her own right as founder of the Women’s League.

Jessie Ethel Sampter

Despite her disabilities from childhood polio, Jessie Ethel Sampter became a Zionist pioneer, helping found kibbutzim and becoming one of Israel’s first modern poets.

Nacha Rivkin

Nacha Rivkin transformed education for Orthodox girls by utilizing new models of education at the girls’ yeshiva she helped found.

Annie Nathan Meyer

Believing that education was the best path for women’s success, Annie Nathan Meyer founded Barnard College, New York’s first liberal arts college for women.

Florence Zacks Melton

Florence Zacks Melton helped create and support important adult education programs in the Jewish community as well as secular causes.

Rebekah Bettelheim Kohut

Rebekah Bettelheim Kohut spent her life caring for others, from managing domestic responsibilities for her sick husband and eight stepchildren to great causes like rebuilding Jewish communities after World War I.

Lizzie Black Kander

With her typical ingenuity, Lizzie Black Kander turned the recipe book she made for a cooking class for new immigrants into a two-million-copy bestseller.

Rebecca Yenawine

Rebecca Yenawine’s unorthodox approach to a group of teenage vandals led her to create a unique art school for inner city kids.

Judy Wolf

Judy Wolf helped create a resource center for children with disabilities in the city of Dnepropetrovsk that not only transformed the lives of families there but became a model for special education throughout the Ukraine.

Gertrude Webb

Gertrude Webb’s compassion for struggling students led her to found programs for teaching both children and adults with learning disabilities.

Marion Stone

As co-founder of Working in the Schools, Marion Stone oversaw 1,500 volunteers in improving Chicago’s public schools.

Judy Somberg

Judy Somberg’s work with the Sister Cities Project in El Salvador helped locals return to their villages after the military takeover in 1987 and freed eleven people who had been “disappeared.”
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