Family

Content type
Collection

Zoe Oreck

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Zoe Oreck on July 3, 2007, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Oreck, an eighteen-year-old resident of New Orleans, reflects on her displacement during Hurricane Katrina, her temporary life in Houston, and her changed perspective on government, community, spirituality, and Jewish social life.

Sophie Oreck

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Sophie Oreck on July 2, 2007, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Sophie shares her school life, experiences during Hurricane Katrina, finding stability in soccer, benefiting from her connected Jewish family, and her Jewish life, including her bat mitzvah, trips to Israel, and passion for Jewish history.

Joan Nathan

Project
Washington D.C. Stories

Deborah Ross interviewed Joan Nathan on July 12, 2011, in Washington, DC, as part of the Washington D.C. Stories Oral History Project. Nathan reflects on the significance of food to Jewish life, as she recounts her career as a cookbook author, cultural historian, and food writer who combines recipes with stories to educate about Jewish life, tradition, and history.

Hinda Miller

Project
DAVAR: Vermont Jewish Women's History Project

Ann Zinn Buffum and Sandra Stillman Gartner interviewed Hinda Miller on December 5, 2006, in Burlington, Vermont as part of DAVAR's Vermont Jewish Oral History Project. Miller details her family background, travels to Lithuania, Ireland, and England, growing up in Montreal, educational experiences, involvement in yoga and Kabbalah, inventing the sports bra, political career as a state senator, and reflections on her family and Jewish identity.

Susan Leader

Project
DAVAR: Vermont Jewish Women's History Project

Sandra Stillman Gartner and Ann Buffum interviewed Susan Leader on July 23, 2008, in Andover, Vermont, as part of DAVAR's Oral History Project. Leader discusses her family's history, her upbringing in rural Vermont, her passion for pottery, her education, and her reflections on raising children in the Jewish tradition.

Lonnie Zarum (Schaffer)

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Lonnie Zarum, formerly Schaffer, on August 30, 2007, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Zarum reflects on her experiences growing up in a modern Orthodox Jewish family in London, her move to New Orleans, surviving Hurricane Katrina, the challenges faced by her synagogue, and her personal growth and gratitude in the aftermath of the disaster.

Minna Shavitz

Project
Weaving Women's Words

Marcie Cohen Ferris interviewed Minna Shavitz on March 22, 2001, in Baltimore, Maryland, for the Weaving Women's Words series. Shavitz details her upbringing in the South, encountering antisemitism, her family dynamics, college life, marriage, owning a deli, and the challenges and joys of her personal and professional life.

Janet Krane

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Janet Krane on November 2, 2006, in Metairie, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina’s Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Krane recounts her experience during Hurricane Katrina, including the challenges faced at Memorial Hospital and the controversy surrounding euthanized patients, as well as her reflections on family, community, and rebuilding New Orleans.

Barbara Jacobs

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Barbara Jacobs on November 5, 2006, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Jacobs recounts her Reform upbringing in Indiana, her experiences in New Orleans, including Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, her love for music, the loss of her home and piano, and her strong connection to New Orleans, Judaism, and her family.

Bess Fishman

Project
Weaving Women's Words

Elaine Eff interviewed Bess Fischman on May 30 and June 8, 2001, in Baltimore, Maryland, as part of the Weaving Women's Words oral history project. Fishman shares memories of her childhood, family, Jewish observance, marriage, and involvement in Jewish organizations and the Zionist movement, being involved with the Beth T’filoh Sisterhood and visiting Israel.

Joel Colman

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Cantor Joel Colman on August 31, 2006, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina’s Jewish Voices project. Rabbi Colman discusses his background, relocation to New Orleans, evacuation during Hurricane Katrina, living in a FEMA trailer, the significant turnout for the first High Holiday celebration after the storm, fundraising efforts, reflections on the storm's impact, and his son's plan to become a firefighter in New Orleans.

Helen "Lainie" Breaux

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Lainie Breaux on September 17, 2006, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Breaux reflects on her upbringing, activist family background, evacuation during the storm with her newborn son, and her ongoing work as a therapist in New Orleans.

Lois Blum Feinblatt

Project
Weaving Women's Words

Jean Freedman interviewed Lois B. Feinblatt on March 21, 2001, in Baltimore, Maryland, as part of the Weaving Women's Words Oral History Project. Feinblatt talks about her background, including experiences of growing up in a segregated Baltimore, her college years, marriage and motherhood during World War II, her career in welfare and later as a psychotherapist, and reflects on her Jewish practice and the Jewish community in Baltimore.

Rodney Steiner

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Rodney Steiner on December 11, 2006, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Steiner recounts his upbringing, education, and career as a physician in New Orleans, including his experiences during Hurricane Katrina, the resilience of the medical community, and his love for his family and the city.

Arlene Barron

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Arlene Barron on December 14, 2006, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Arlene Barron discusses her childhood, involvement with the Jewish Community Center (JCC), experiences during Hurricane Katrina, and the emotional impact of the storm on herself and her family.

Collage with TV Still from "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend"

"Remember That We Suffered": Grappling with Privilege and Intergenerational Trauma as a Jew

Abigail Gilman

We can acknowledge the horrors that our ancestors endured without letting that knowledge stop us from living fully and compassionately in the present.

Collage of Illustrated Adult Hand Holding Child's Hand

My Dad Gives Me Choices: On Male Authority Today

Mira Eras

The chance to have power over my own choices is an incredible opportunity that many people don't have, now more than ever.

Topics: Family, Feminism

Diane Africk

Project
Katrina's Jewish Voices

Rosalind Hinton interviewed Diane Africk on July 11, 2007, in New Orleans, Louisiana, as part of the Katrina's Jewish Voices Oral History Project. Africk, a pediatric neurologist, recounts her experiences growing up in the city, her Jewish identity and involvement in Touro Synagogue, her career at Tulane Medical Center, the challenges she faced during and after Hurricane Katrina, and her criticism of the government's response to the storm.

Collage with Outline of Western Wall and Illustrated Woman Facing Away From It

In the Streets of Jerusalem: Discovering What Jewish Space Means to Me

Maddie Nowack

Throughout my many years of Hebrew school, I was taught that Israel was supposed to be my second home. After I traveled there, I realized this couldn’t be further from the truth for me.

Collage of Outlined Abstract Images: Face with Tear Drop, Candlesticks, Challah

Grief Made Me an Outsider, but Shabbat Drew Me In: How Judaism Helps Me Make Sense of Loss

Amelia Posner-Hess

Shabbat at synagogue was the one place where my grief belonged, where I belonged, after my my dad died. 

Leora Krygier and her grandmother Rachel Halperin, 1970

"Put a Lid on It": My Grandma’s Feminist Formula

Leora Krygier

My grandma's advice has stuck with me: "Be the pokreshke," the pot lid.

Topics: Family

Joan Nathan

Award-winning journalist and cookbook author Joan Nathan is a transformative figure in documenting and exploring the evolving Jewish experience both in America and around the globe through the powerful lens of food. A long-standing contributing writer to The New York Times and Tablet Magazine, Nathan is the author of eleven books, as well as hundreds of articles, podcasts, interviews, and public presentations about Jewish, global, and American foodways. 

Sephardi Women in the Dutch Republic

In the early modern period, Dutch Sephardim formed a community famous for its wealth, grandeur, and benevolence.

The article highlights the social, economic and religious position of Sephardi women in the Dutch Republic, arriving as immigrants from persecutions by the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions and their offspring, settled in generations afterwards. Their adjustment to normative Judaism is being discussed as well as their professional education and their contributions to Sephardi and Dutch society.     

Six year old in pink dress seated next to elderly man dressed in a suit, sitting in pews at a synagogue

My Grandfather: Guide in My Jewish Feminist Journey

Simone Feinblum

It may seem strange to credit my 87-year-old grandfather for the development of my Jewish and feminist identities, but he helped me gain the confidence to speak my mind and advocate for myself.

Emma Mordecai

Emma Mordecai (1812-1906) navigated direct challenges to her Jewish faith and to her southern ideals by remaining loyal to both. She responded to the Civil War, which stirred antisemitism in the South and especially threatened Richmonders, with renewed commitments to Judaism and to the racist ideals of the Confederacy.

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