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Sports

Gladys Heldman launches "World Tennis Magazine"

May 13, 1953

Tennis player, promoter, and women's advocate Gladys Heldman published the inaugural issue of "World Tennis Magazine." a forum calling for equal status and opportunity for women athletes.

Senda Berenson officiates at first collegiate women's basketball game

March 22, 1893

Senda Berenson, the "Mother of Women's Basketball," organized and officiated at the first women's basketball game.

Sports in the United States

The ways in which females participated in sporting life within both the immigrant and the wider culture reveal how women’s sports activities at times promoted assimilation yet also generated discord within the generational, gender, class and ethnic context of their lives in the United States.

Fanny "Bobbie" Rosenfeld

Fanny “Bobbie” Rosenfeld was named Canada’s woman athlete of the first half- century in 1950. She was a consummate all-round athlete, coach, sports administrator, official, and journalist.

Olympic Medal Winners

A table of Jewish Women who have won Olympic medals.

Gladys Heldman

Gladys Heldman, born in New York City on May 13, 1922, to scholarly Jewish parents, was an unlikely person to become a leader in women’s tennis. Yet women tennis players today owe their equal status in the sport to her important efforts.

Eva Szekely

Olympic medalist Eva Szekely was born on April 3, 1927, in Budapest, Hungary. Between 1946 and 1954 Eva Szekely won thirty-two national individual swimming titles and eleven national team titles. In 1954 she gave birth to a daughter, Andrea (Gyarmati), who also became an Olympic medalist swimmer.

Sports in Germany: 1898-1938

From the 1890s, despite fierce resistance, German women increasingly participated in gymnastics, games and other sporting activities.

Sport: Yishuv to the Present

While it was no easy task for women to integrate successfully into the world of modern competitive sports, there is currently a marked increase in the number of competitive women athletes throughout the world. A similar development, though slower and with more modest achievements, has also occurred in Jewish sports.

Anna Sipos

Born in Hungary in 1908, Anna Sipos is remembered for her accomplishments as an outstanding table tennis player, ranked the second best women’s player of her time. Altogether, Sipos won twenty-one medals—eleven gold, six silver and four bronze—in World Championship table tennis competition.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Sports." (Viewed on December 14, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/sports>.

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