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Prayer

"Thank G-D for creating me according to your will"

Three years ago I had the opportunity to visit the rare books room at the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) library. I saw many interesting things, but one that would change my life forever.

The story of creation: Artist Miriam Karp on making her daughter's bat mitzvah tallit

Miriam Karp is an artist who has been creating hundreds of one-of-a-kind ketubot since 1976.

El Adon-think-so: Battling singer's block with help from my mom

My New Jersey bat mitzvah party was a lavish affair.

Shabbat at Planned Parenthood

The people awake at 7:15 a.m., when I left the house this past Saturday morning, were walking their dogs, washing off the streets in front of their stores and picking up a bite to eat.

Trying tallit and tefillin: Working on my hyprocrisy

A few months ago, I realized that I wanted to start wearing Tallit and Tefillin. Not because I had some grand change in ideology, but because I realized that doing so actually goes along with the ideology I’ve professed to have for quite some time.

Ruth F. Brin, 1921 - 2009

Ruth F. Brin was a literary pioneer famous for her authentic Jewish poetry, prayer services, scholarly articles, children's books, librettos, a memoir, and at the age of 86, her first novel.

She was born in Saint Paul, MN and lived in Minneapolis until her death, at the age of 88, on Wednesday, September 30th. However, her poetry and teachings moved beyond the Twin Cities, filling the pages of Reconstructionist, Reform and Conservative prayer books used in synagogues around the country.

Savina J. Teubal, 1926 - 2005

Savina Teubal was a daughter of the conflagration that expelled Jews from the Arab world. She grew up in Argentina in what she described as a "tight-knit" and sophisticated Syrian Jewish community that celebrated learning and the preservation of tradition—for sons. Savina became her own woman as she made her way to England and then to America, applying her natural understanding of the imperative of social activism and community building to create connections in her new home. In her thirties, she began to study, and claimed as her own the Biblical legacy of her people.

The scary subtext of "rethinking egalitarianism"

Last week in the Forward, Jay Michaelson writes about the need to rethink egalitarianism.  Egalitarian synagogues, he says, tend to be egalitarian in only one way: everyone is equally bored.  (“Egalitarian” in American Jewish life has historically referred to prayer services where men and women can both participate fully and take on leadership roles.)  He talks about friends who attend Orthodox prayer services because they find more meaning in the service, and about how attempts at inclusiveness and egalitarianism often translate into long responsive readings in English where nobody really believes a word.

Kavanah

I am, among many defining facets, a woman and a maker of tallit. A few days ago, I was gathering materials to write about the choices we make--to pray, to wear a beautiful prayer shawl, to leyn from the Torah, to actively weave ritual into our busy lives.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Prayer." (Viewed on December 14, 2017) <https://jwa.org/topics/prayer>.

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