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Immigration

"Settlement Cookbook" author Lizzie Black Kander is born

May 28, 1858

Birth of Lizzie Black Kander, a leading Jewish social reformer in Milwaukee and author of the still-in print "Settlement Cookbook."

Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls opens

May 22, 1899

The Clara de Hirsch Home for Working Girls, a residence and vocational training center for young women, opened its doors.

Lily Winner publishes a defense of open immigration in "The Nation"

May 18, 1921

Writer, playwright, and activist Winner was a progressive voice for immigrants and immigration reform.

Review of Mary Antin's "The Promised Land" appears in the "New York Times"

April 14, 1912

A review of Mary Antin's "The Promised Land," an autobiography recounting her life in the Russian Pale of Settlement and as an immigrant in Boston, appeared in the "New York Times."

Florence Prag Kahn elected as first Jewish woman in U.S. Congress

February 17, 1925

Florence Prag Kahn won a special election, becoming the fifth woman and first Jewish woman to serve in the United States Congress.

Anzia Yezierska

Having immigrated with her family from Eastern Europe, Yezierska chronicled the hunger of her generation of newly arrived Jewish Americans around the turn of the century. Her novels, short stories, and autobiographical writing vividly depict both the literal hunger of poverty and the metaphoric hunger for security, education, companionship, home, and meaning—in short, for the American dream.

Yemenite Women in Israel: 1948 to the Present Day

Approximately fifty thousand Jews came to Israel from Yemen via Operation Magic Carpet during the period of mass immigration (1949–1950) (Barer 1956; Sa’adon 2002: 115–125). A further 3,500 arrived between 1988–1996 (Saadon 2002, 122). The transition of Yemenite women from a traditional-religious society to a western-secular society is marked by a certain ambivalence.

Yemen and the Yishuv

Yemenite women proved to be most stable and resourceful, both in Yemen where tradition reigned, and also after immigration to [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:309]Erez Israel[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] and New York, facing changes and challenges in turbulent times. They adapted to changing economic, social and communal conditions, acculturated in language skills and organizational life, and were instrumental in bringing up their daughters and sons to successfully integrate into the new worlds.

Lillian D. Wald

Lillian Wald began her work in 1893, when she discovered the need for health care among New York’s largely Jewish immigrant population. Her solution to this problem, in the form of public health nursing—a term she coined—served only as the beginning of her life’s work, which was dedicated to providing health care, education and social services to the poor and immigrant members of her Henry Street Settlement, and beyond.

Vocational Training Schools in the United States

For nearly fifty years, vocational training schools enabled immigrant women and their single daughters to aspire to, and in many instances actually attain, a higher standard of living.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Immigration." (Viewed on February 18, 2019) <https://jwa.org/topics/immigration>.

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