Paula E. Hyman

Hyman, Paula E.: See biographical entry.

Articles by this author

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Deborah Dash Moore

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Judaic Studies in the United States

When the Association for Jewish Studies (AJS) was established in 1969 as the professional organization of scholars in the interdisciplinary field of Judaic studies, there were no women among its founders. In 2005–06 women comprised 41% of the AJS membership. Within the past generation a field that was traditionally dominated by men has gradually witnessed the emergence of a significant number of women scholars.

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Irene Fine

In the field of continuing Jewish education for women, the preeminent pioneer is Irene Fine, the founder in 1977 of the Woman’s Institute for Continuing Jewish Education, based in San Diego, California. The institute continues to innovate in Jewish women’s education and in the publication of books on Jewish women by Jewish women.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Paula E. Hyman." (Viewed on October 17, 2019) <https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/author/hyman-paula>.

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