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Writing

Bonnie Anderson

Combatting centuries of sexism that had erased women’s contributions, Bonnie Anderson published one of the first major surveys of women’s history, A History of Their Own.

Lynn Povich

In her bestselling 2012 book Good Girls Revolt, Lynn Povich described the 1970 lawsuit against Newsweek that enabled her to become the journal’s first female senior editor.

Shulamith Hareven

From capturing the lingering pain of Holocaust survivors to describing the harsh conditions of Palestinian refugee camps, Shulamith Hareven used her writing to push Israelis to confront uncomfortable truths.

Bracha Habas

One of the few women journalists to work in Israel before the founding of the state, Bracha Habas became beloved for her work as a writer and editor of children’s literature.

Rivka Guber

Rivka Bumaghina Guber’s selflessness and her painful sacrifices for the young State of Israel earned her the title “Mother of the Sons” and the respect of the nation.

Michal Govrin

As the child of a Holocaust survivor, Michal Govrin has used her writing to open a broader conversation about the enduring legacy of the Holocaust.

Nadine Gordimer

When Nadine Gordimer’s depictions of apartheid earned her the Nobel Prize for Literature, she used her fame to fund HIV prevention and treatment in her native South Africa.

Jewish-American Witches

Despite my positive feelings about them, I was disappointed that Tina and Queenie didn’t acknowledge their Jewishness, that the movie left this part of their identity ambiguous. Sometimes it’s fun as a Jewish viewer to get winks that fictional characters may be members of the tribe. The hints of Judaism in Fantastic Beasts, like Tina’s middle name being Esther and a glimpse of a challah, made me smile. But since having two Jewish women starring in such a global, mainstream fantasy film would be monumental, I wished that Tina and Queenie had claimed their heritage proudly like I do.

Writing a Revolutionary

Authors are often asked about the inspiration behind their books. Usually, that question is a tricky one to answer. But in the case of my historical novel for young adults, Audacity, it’s easy. The life of labor activist Clara Lemlich was all the inspiration I needed.

Women Of Influence: What Macbeth Taught Us About Women In Power

That Scottish Shakespearian tragedy, so shrouded in mystery that it is unlucky even to say its name, gave society new ideas about women that have stayed with us since 1606, when the play debuted in London.  

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Writing." (Viewed on February 17, 2018) <https://jwa.org/topics/writing>.

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